Global U-2 flying operations not impacted by recent crash

A U- 2 Dragon Lady approaches an altitude near 70,000 ft. above California, Mar. 23, 2016. The pilot must wear a full-pressure suit similar to NASA astronaut suits. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Robert M. Trujillo)

A U- 2 Dragon Lady approaches an altitude near 70,000 ft. above California, Mar. 23, 2016. The pilot must wear a full-pressure suit similar to NASA astronaut suits. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Robert M. Trujillo)

Staff Sgt. Jason Creese, 9the Aircraft Maintenance Squadron U-2 Dragon Lady dedicated crew chief, guides a U-2 Dragon Lady to park June 7, 2016, at Royal Air Force Fairford, Gloucestershire, England. The jet was met by an en route recovery team (ERT) in England to transition aircraft from and to Beale Air Force Base, California, and forward operating locations (FOL). The ERT is used like a pit crew at the midway point in Fairford, ensuring the aircraft are prepared to make it to their next destination. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ramon A. Adelan)

Staff Sgt. Jason Creese, 9the Aircraft Maintenance Squadron U-2 Dragon Lady dedicated crew chief, guides a U-2 Dragon Lady to park June 7, 2016, at Royal Air Force Fairford, Gloucestershire, England. The jet was met by an en route recovery team (ERT) in England to transition aircraft from and to Beale Air Force Base, California, and forward operating locations (FOL). The ERT is used like a pit crew at the midway point in Fairford, ensuring the aircraft are prepared to make it to their next destination. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ramon A. Adelan)

A U-2 Dragon Lady is inspected June 7, 2016, at Royal Air Force Fairford, Gloucestershire, England. The U-2 was met by Beale's en route recovery team (ERT) to perform maintenance before being sent to a forward operating location (FOL). (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ramon A. Adelan)

A U-2 Dragon Lady is inspected June 7, 2016, at Royal Air Force Fairford, Gloucestershire, England. The U-2 was met by Beale's en route recovery team (ERT) to perform maintenance before being sent to a forward operating location (FOL). (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ramon A. Adelan)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

Flying operations worldwide for the U-2 Dragon Lady have not been impacted as a result of a recent crash here on September 20, 2016.

The demand signal for the U-2 to continue supporting combatant commanders and meet national security objectives has not diminished. The aircraft continues to be flown by highly trained pilots globally.

As a result of the crash, Beale put a hold on flying training missions locally in order to respond to the incident. The 9th Reconnaissance Wing intends to return to normal flying operations locally this week.

“Our ability to fly missions in support of commanders has not been impacted by the recent crash. We continue to carry out our mission of providing high altitude ISR and delivering that decision advantage to combatant commanders,” said Col. Larry Broadwell, 9th RW commander. 

The aircraft crash is currently under investigation.