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Both 23d Component Maintenance Squadron propulsion technicians, Airman 1st Class Anthony Guevara, left, and Airman 1st Class Jesse Mendheim, disassemble a TF-34 engine used in A-10C Thunderbolt lls, Jan. 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Airmen pay close attention to detail while systematically breaking the engine down. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Continuous Process Improvement bears fruit
The investment in Airmen’s ideas through a Continuous Process Improvement event this past January has Moody’s propulsion team displaying measurable improvements in the timeliness and effectiveness of supporting the A-10C Thunderbolt II’s increased flying mission. Over the last seven months, The 23d Component Maintenance Squadron has gradually implemented the ideas from approximately 20 civilians and Airmen from almost every enlisted rank to better maintain the TF-34 engine used in A-10s. The results speak for themselves. “We have seen our Airmen at all levels react positively to the initiative,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Michael Irwin, 23d CMS former commander during the CPI event. “The men and women at the Propulsion flight have completely embraced the idea of continuous improvement and they want to be the best! You can feel that excitement every time you visit their facility.”
0 8/17
2017
A U.S. Air Force HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter from Moody Air Force Base, Ga., lands during Stealth Guardian in a wooded area near Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., Aug. 8, 2017. Exercise Stealth Guardian enhances rescue capabilities in multiple environments
As a pilot stands in a forest, seemingly devoid of human life, he is watched – by friend and foe. The quiet serenity of the woodlands erupts with the whirling of helicopter blades and the incoming of simulated opposing forces, his rescue or his demise still uncertain.
0 8/17
2017
Airmen talking in prepping HH-60G Pave Hawk for flight. ACC works to empower leaders at every level
“If we’re going to talk about leadership in that environment then we’re going to have to build the trust and initiative in our lower components that they feel comfortable accepting risk and moving out and making decisions on their own,” Holmes said.
0 8/11
2017
An Airman from the 41st Helicopter Maintenance Unit attaches a panel to the tail of an HH-60G Pave Hawk, Jan. 7, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The 41st HMU works 24/7 to ensure aircraft are ready to fly at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Callaghan/Released)

41st maintainers reach perfection
When most Airmen on the flightline see aircraft tail number A6773 flying through the sky, they see a typical HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopter. Now because of the hard work from the 41st Helicopter Maintenance Unit, they see a distinct mythical unicorn that hasn’t been seen in 10 years. These Airmen dedicated hundreds of hours of hard work to achieve not one, but three “black letter initials,” a marking of approval on an inspection checklist certifying that the aircraft is not only mission-ready, but it is operationally perfect: zero discrepancies, zero write-ups and zero inspection violations.
0 8/10
2017
Paratroopers jump from a U.S. Army CH-47 Chi-nook during Leapfest, Aug. 6, 2017, in West Kingstown, R.I. The Rhode Island National guard hosted the 34th annual event, which is the largest international static line jump competition in the world. Team Moody’s Airmen represented the only U.S. sister-service team and earned second place among 70 participating teams. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) 820th Base Defense Group takes second at Leapfest
Airmen from the 820th Base Defense Group traveled to Rhode Island to compete in the largest international static line jump training and competition in the world. The 820th BDG represented the only U.S. sister-service team and placed second of the 70 teams at the 34th Annual Leapfest, hosted by The Rhode Island National Guard hosted “Winning second place feels great,” said Staff Sgt. Mark Melchiori, 822d Base Defense Squadron fireteam leader and Rhode Island native. “It’s not everyday you get to do something like this. We’re always training, but it’s cool to get to have some fun with it.”
0 8/10
2017
Congressman Will Hurd, 23rd District of Texas, visits with Maj. Gen. Mary O’Brien, commander, 25th Air Force. National security, ISR among topics discussed during Congressman's 25th AF Visit
Congressman Will Hurd, 23rd District of Texas, visited with Maj. Gen. Mary O’Brien, commander, 25th Air Force, and other leaders at the Numbered Air Force’s headquarters Aug. 4, 2017.
0 8/04
2017
Portrait of Capt. Charles Howell in his flight suit. Nuclear Deterrence Operations names CGO of the Year
Winners of the 2016 Nuclear Deterrence Operations, and Nuclear and Missile Operations Awards were announced in July 2017. Among the selected few was a 70th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing cyber warrior.
0 8/04
2017
Maj. Richard, 432nd Wing MQ-1 Predator pilot, watches the Predator fly over a C-5M Supergalaxy while reminiscing how about how he became a U.S. Air Force pilot. As a seven-year-old boy, Richard fell in love with the C-5 and aviation during Lethbridge International Airshow in Alberta, Canada. More than twenty years later he became a C-5 pilot, flying for four years in that airframe. Now, he flies the MQ-1 Predator. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) Inspired by air show, boy becomes USAF pilot
Inspiration can be fleeting or it can be enduring. As seven-year-old boy, Richard felt this powerful drive during a family outing to an air show, he had no idea it would shape his future career helping him become a U.S. Air Force pilot. "Lethbridge was the first air show I went to when I was a kid,” said Maj. Richard, 432nd Wing MQ-1 Predator pilot. "We looked at all the airplanes and there wasn’t a single airplane that made more of an impression on me than the C-5 [Galaxy] did. I was just enthralled and I didn't quite know why, but even at that age I knew I wanted to be a part of it and fly it. It became my greatest dream."
0 8/03
2017
U.S. Air Force and Royal Air Force joint terminal attack controllers communicate with 23d Fighter Group A-10C Thunderbolt IIs overhead during a close air support training exercise, July 26, 2017, in Lakeland, Ga. Two RAF members recently spent time with the 93d Air Ground Operations Wing to compare and contrast how each entity conducts business and to plan future coalition training events. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Royal Air Force JTACs integrate with US counterparts
Members of the United Kingdom’s Royal Air Force recently spent time immersing with the 93d Air Ground Operations Wing at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The NATO allies visiting were Joint Terminal Attack Controllers tasked with building stronger ties with the 93d AGOW in hopes of future integration opportunities.
0 8/03
2017
Holloman Holloman supports Patriot Warrior
49th Logistics Readiness Squadron and 635th Materiel Maintenance Group provided supplies for Patriot Warrior July 28, 2017. Patriot Warrior is a joint field training exercise that replicates all aspects of combat medical service support. Without the cargo provided by Holloman personnel and the delivery made by Army’s 424th Transportation Company, Patriot Warrior could not happen.
0 8/03
2017
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