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A U.S. Air Force F-35 Lightning II, F-16 Fightning Falcon, F-22 Raptor, A-10C Thunderbolt II  and P-51 Mustang fly in formation during the 2018 Heritage Flight Training and Cerification Course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., March 4, 2018. During the course, aircrews practice ground and flight training to enable civilian pilots of historic military aircraft and U.S. Air Force pilots of current fighter aircraft to fly safely in formations together. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Michael X. Beyer) Heritage Flight: making a connection
DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz., -- The U.S. Air Force Heritage Flight Training and Certification Course demonstrates the evolution of the USAF's airpower by flying today’s fighter aircraft in formation with World War II, Korean and Vietnam War - era aircraft. The training includes a performance of formations by current USAF fighters such as F-16 Fighting Falcon, F-35 Lightning II, F-22 Raptor and A-10 Thunderbolt II along with historical warbirds like the P-51 Mustang, P-38 Lightning, P-40 Warhawk and F-86 Sabre.
0 3/05
2018
DM hosts the annual Heritage Flight Training course prior to the air show season as a familiarization opportunity for active duty pilots to fly in formation with WWII and Korean-era planes. Heritage Flight Training Course dazzles DM community
Davis-Monthan Air Force base hosts the annual Heritage Flight Training course prior to the air show season as a familiarization opportunity for active duty pilots to fly in formation with WWII and Korean-era planes. Each morning prior to the day’s training sorties, the ramp is open to service members, veterans, and their families.
0 3/05
2018
Max Garland (left), Korean War veteran, views a picture of a MiG Alley sign from the Korean War, Oct. 26, 2017, at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina. MiG Alley was the name given by the United Nations pilots to the northwestern portion of North Korea during the Korean War.  (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman 1st Class Miranda A. Loera) Korean War veterans reunite for one last hoorah
A reunion is held for this association every year at different bases around the states. This year, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina had the privilege to host the final official reunion for the group, Oct. 26-28, 2017.
0 11/06
2017
Courtesy Photo Greatest Heroes of the 4th Fighter Wing: 75th Anniversary Edition
Among the most significant “firsts” achieved by the “Fourth But First” was James Jabara becoming the world’s first all jet ace in the Korean War. Not only was this an accomplishment that garnered Jabara eternal fame in world history, he achieved this distinction in the most difficult of circumstances. James Jabara was born in Muskogee, Oklahoma, Oct. 10, 1923. He was first generation American, his family was from Lebanon. He was raised in Wichita, Kansas, and said to be a patriotic American with a great work ethic. Jabara worked in the family grocery store and earned the rank of Eagle Scout with the Boy Scouts. Young Jabara probably never realized that his amazing future was hurtling at him at supersonic speed. With World War II underway, Jabara entered flight school as a teenager and earned his wings in 1943. He flew a P-51 Mustang in the 363rd Fighter Group of the 9th Air Force in Europe. Jabara flew more than 100 combat missions, was credited with destroying 1.5 German planes, and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. After the war Jabara remained in the Air Force and became a jet pilot
0 7/26
2017
Col Robert Kirtley enjoys a soft drink as a young Captain on a flight line. He was born July 26, 1917 in Spartanburg, South Carolina. He is a WWII and Korean War veteran who served in the Air Force for more than 25 years. He graduated from Wofford College, and commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in 1940. His first assignment was with the 27th Pursuit Squadron, First Pursuit Group, at Selfridge Field, Michigan. Air Force veteran turns 100
Robert Kirtley was born July 26, 1917, in Spartanburg, South Carolina. He is a WWII and Korean War veteran who served in the Air Force for more than 25 years. Like many men from his generation he has mastered the art of the understatement. On turning 100, he said, “Well, one hundred years is a long time,” and reflecting on some of the most vicious fighting during WWII, he said, “I didn’t really fancy getting shot at.”
0 7/26
2017
Members of the F-86 Sabre Association pose for a photo with Col. Michael Drowley, U.S. Air Force Weapons School commandant on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., April 7, 2017. The F-86 Sabre Association met April 24 on the flightline here to pay homage to the retired jet and the Airmen who flew it for the last time. (U.S. Air Force photo by Susan Garcia/Released) F-86 Sabre veterans deactivate 35-year association
Throughout the storied past of Army Air Corps and the U.S. Air Force, many aircraft have laid the foundation for today’s fleet of air power.
0 5/05
2017
Retired Airman 1st Class Julius Farrar was awarded the Purple Heart by Lt. Col. Kyle Kloeckner at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., April 28, 2016. Farrar served in the mountains keeping a transmitter working 24 hours a day, seven days a week during the Korean War. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kevin Tanenbaum) Long awaited Purple Heart
Julius Farrar, after six decades, was awarded the Purple Heart for injuries that he sustained during the Korean War a ceremony in his honor on at Nellis AFB, on April 28.
0 5/04
2016
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