News Search

FILTER:
A-10C Thunderbolt II
Clear

News Comments Updated
1 2
U.S. Air Force Reserve Maj. Matt Paetzhold, 76th Fighter Squadron A-10C Thunderbolt II instructor pilot, performs preflight checks in an A-10C Thunderbolt II, Sept. 9, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. After graduating the Weapons Instructor Course, Paetzhold joined the Airmen who serve as tactical and operational advisors to military leaders at all levels. Due to the relationship between the 75th FS and 76th FS, Paetzhold is slated to deploy as the 75th FSs weapons officer. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Snider) Pilot exemplifies Total Force Integration
As part of a Total Force Integration initiative, an Air Force Reserve Citizen Airman attended attended the Weapons Instructor Course (WIC) to deploy with his former active-duty squadron. Captivated by the close-air support and combat-search and rescue missions of the A-10C Thunderbolt II, U.S. Air Force Reserve Maj. Matt Paetzhold, 76th Fighter Squadron A-10C Thunderbolt II instructor pilot, joined the ranks of those responsible for effectively integrating multiple weapons systems across the land, air, space and cyber domains.
0 11/22
2017
Moody Airmen render salutes during the 23d Maintenance Squadron re-designation ceremony, Nov. 9, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Lt. Col. Neal Van Houten took command of Air Combat Command’s second largest squadron, leading the 800 men and women who are responsible for executing safe and reliable maintenance on aircraft systems, ground equipment and munitions to support the 23d Wing's attack and rescue missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Greg Nash) Re-designated 23d Maintenance Squadron continues legacy
Approximately 800 Airmen from the 23d Component and Equipment Maintenance Squadrons merged to become the 23d Maintenance Squadron, Air Combat Command’s second largest maintenance squadron, during a re-designation ceremony, Nov. 9, here. As these Airmen stood in formation behind unfurled guidons, bearing new names, they now abide by a new motto – ‘MXS!... The Biggest!... The Best!’
0 11/13
2017
Members of the 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron prepare an A-10C Thunderbolt II to be washed, Aug. 28, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Maintenance procedures require that A-10s are washed at least every 180 days to prevent maintenance issues and safety hazards to the pilot. Since strong chemicals are used to clean the aircraft Airmen must wear personal protective equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) A 23d Wing ‘hawg’ gets a bath
What has roughly 40 teeth, sounds like ‘brrrt,’ and occasionally needs a bath? The 23d Wing’s A-10C Thunderbolt IIs, also known as ‘Hawgs,’ are subject to an assortment of scheduled maintenance appointments to include washes every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours. “It’s extremely important that maintenance keeps the aircraft clean,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Thomas Harney, 75th Fighter Squadron director of operations and A-10 pilot. “Every time we fire the gun, gases flow up and cover the aircraft with grease which can affect operational components of the aircraft and the pilot’s visibility.”
0 9/01
2017
A U.S. Air Force A-10C Thunderbolt II, assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron and a part of the A-10 West Heritage Flight Team, and a P-38 Lightning fly in formation during the Los Angeles County Air Show in Lancaster, Calif., March 26, 2017. The A-10 WHFT is scheduled to perform in 9 more air shows throughout the U.S. this year after resurging from a 5-year-long inactivation period. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby) A-10 West Heritage Flight Team returns to the skies
The A-10 West Heritage Flight Team performed at its first air show after nearly five years of inactivation March 25-26. The demo team out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., kicked off its resurgence at the Los Angeles County Air Show in Lancaster, Calif., by flying in formation with the World War II-era P-38 Lightning.
0 3/29
2017
A U.S. Air Force A-10C Thunderbolt II and a P-47 Thunderbolt fly in formation during the 2017 Heritage Flight Training and Certification Course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Feb. 10, 2017. The annual aerial demonstration training event has been held at D-M since 2001. The modern aircraft that participated in this year’s HFTCC were the F-35 Lightning II, the F-22 Raptor, F-16 Fighting Falcon and the A-10C Thunderbolt II. The historic aircraft included the P-51 and T-51 Mustangs, the P-40 Warhawk, the P-38 Lightning, the P-47 Thunderbolt, the T-33 Shooting Star and the F-86 Sabre. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Betty R. Chevalier) 2017 Heritage Flight Training and Certification Course
A U.S. Air Force A-10C Thunderbolt II and a P-47 Thunderbolt fly in formation during the 2017 Heritage Flight Training and Certification Course at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Feb. 10, 2017. The annual aerial demonstration training event has been held at D-M since 2001. The modern aircraft that participated in this year’s HFTC were the F-35 Lightning II, the F-22 Raptor, F-16 Fighting Falcon and the A-10C Thunderbolt II. The historic aircraft included the P-51 and T-51 Mustangs, the P-40 Warhawk, the P-38 Lightning, the P-47 Thunderbolt, the T-33 Shooting Star and the F-86 Sabre
0 2/10
2017
A TF-34 engine gets cleaned prior to an engine run in the newly upgraded “Hush Hush 1,” Jan. 23, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Hush House 1’s construction was completed in four months and received $300,000 worth of upgrades such as two new storage rooms, a camera system, new communication system and a modern electrical system brought to standard building codes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Greg Nash)   'Hush Houses' receive operational upgrades
Moody’s 23d Component Maintenance Squadron’s test cell facility “hush houses” underwent upgrades to improve testing operations in support of the A-10C Thunderbolt II flying mission. A hush house is an enclosed environment that suppresses the sound of engines when tested for serviceability. The construction process for Hush House 1 was completed in four months and received $300,000 worth of upgrades. The under construction Hush House 2 will resemble its counterpart, receiving a $500,000 facelift with an estimated completion time of April 2017. The advantages of the upgrades include centralized storage accessibility, modern lighting and a safer work environment for the facility to test serviceable engines. The improvements to the facilities can be credited to civilian contractors who also provided ongoing support by contributing analysis of failures, component redundancy and upgrades for the test cell’s current and future operational capability requirements to the 23d CMS.
0 1/31
2017
Airman First Class Connor McDonald, left, and Staff Sgt. Tayrell Washington, both 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit weapons load team members, use an MJ-1C bomb lift to transport a Mark 82 general purpose bomb during Green Flag-West 17-03, Jan. 24, 2017, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Weapons Airmen enabled joint force training during the two-week exercise by loading weapons, inspecting jets and maintaining munitions systems. Some of the live munitions included the Mark 82 and 84 general purpose bombs, high-explosive incendiary 30mm rounds and the 500 pound GBU-12 Paveway II laser-guided bomb. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Ryan Callaghan) Weapons Airmen enable joint training
Weapons troops from the 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit enabled joint force training during Green Flag-West 17-03, Jan. 13-27 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev.GFW, an air-land combat integration exercise, provided these Airmen with a rare opportunity to put their home station training to use by allowing them to load live munitions
0 1/30
2017
Sticky notes represent every step to overhauling a TF-34 engine used in A-10s, Jan. 23, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Representatives from Air Combat Command traveled to Moody Air Force Base to participate in a Continuous Process Improvement event with the goal of decreasing the scheduled 28 days it takes to disassemble, repair and reassemble the TF-34 engine. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Moody Consolidated Maintenance Squadron aims to raise the bar
The 23d Component Maintenance Squadron, here, utilized the week of Jan. 23-27 to begin assessing ways to better support the A-10C Thunderbolt II’s increased flying mission. Representatives from Air Combat Command at Langley Air Force Base, Va., and Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., traveled to Moody to participate in the Continuous Process Improvement event.
0 1/27
2017
An A-10C Thunderbolt II upgraded with a new lightweight airborne recovery system V-12 rests on the flight line at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Dec. 21, 2016. The LARS V-12 is designed to allow A-10 pilots a more effective means of communication with individuals on the ground such as downed pilots, pararescuemen and joint terminal attack controllers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby) Upgrade advances A-10s search capability
A-10C Thunderbolt IIs assigned to active duty fighter squadrons here are in the process of having new lightweight airborne recovery systems installed. The LARS V-12 is designed to allow A-10 pilots to communicate more effectively with individuals on the ground such as downed pilots, pararescuemen and joint terminal attack controllers.
0 1/06
2017
A student assigned to the 372nd Training Squadron, Detachment 11, Miniature and Microminiature (2M) Circuit Card Repair course solders a circuit card at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 3, 2016. The 2M program is a part of the U.S. Navy program, but can be applied to multiple airframes in the U.S. Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Betty R. Chevalier) Training detachment expands maintainers' knowledge AF-wide
From the outside, it’s a barren building with no windows and few travelers through the doors, but down its concrete halls, Airmen from all over the world are expanding their knowledge on aircraft maintenance.
0 10/06
2016
1 2
RSS