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The RQ-1 entered the USAF inventory in 1994 and was deployed for the first time over Bosnia in 1995. In 2002, the Predator was armed with AGM-114 Hellfire missiles, re-designated the MQ-1, and given interdiction and armed reconnaissance roles. AF DCGS says goodbye to an old friend
The MQ-1 officially retired from Air Force inventory on March 9, 2018 with the Air Force shifting to solely using the MQ-9 Reaper.
0 3/23
2018
Airmen were able to seamlessly transition between platforms, which prevented a loss of MQ-9 capabilities for combatant commanders. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman James Thompson) Sun setting the MQ-1 Predator: Combat RPAs bring the future faster
As the official retirement of the MQ-1 Predator approaches, many people reflect on the new and innovative capabilities it provided on the battlefield over its tenure. Its shift from an intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance aircraft to a multi-role platform, further shaped the outlook of senior leaders and combatant commanders alike. The MQ-1 revolutionized the Air Force’s use of Remotely Piloted Aircraft in dynamic situations, inevitably paving the way for an all MQ-9 Reaper force.
0 3/02
2018
The MQ-1 served as a premier Remotely Piloted Aircraft for combatant commanders and coalition partners for more than 20 years and is scheduled to officially retire March 9, 2018, at Creech AFB. Sun setting the MQ-1 Predator: MQ-9 Reaper meets demand
With the retirement of the MQ-1 Predator on the horizon, MQ-9 Reapers were successfully transferred via flight from one combat operation to another within the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility for the first time. In January, Airmen facilitated the flight of MQ-9s from Operation Inherent Resolve to Operation Freedom’s Sentinel. This innovative approach took less than 10 percent of the normal time it takes to disassemble, box and ship Remotely Piloted Aircraft via airlift from one theater to another, which allowed warfighters to stay ahead of the pace of modern warfare. As aircrews seamlessly continue to provide dominant, persistent attack and reconnaissance capabilities to meet war front demands from the MQ-9, MQ-1s enter the transition phase out of active inventory.
0 2/26
2018
The Predator started as an RQ-1 in the late 1990s, providing only reconnaissance capabilities until the early 2000s, when it was equipped with two AGM-114 Hellfire missiles and designated as a multirole asset. Sun setting the MQ-1 Predator: A history of innovation
The MQ-1 Predator is a Remotely Piloted Aircraft flown by aircrew assigned to the 432nd Wing/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing at Creech and units around the world. It has contributed to the U.S. warfighting efforts in unprecedented ways and is scheduled to sunset on March 9, 2018 as the Air Force transitions to an all MQ-9 Reaper force. With the introduction of aerial warfare, countries all over the world raced to the skies to gain tactical advantage over their adversaries. Devices such as balloons were used in early conflict for reconnaissance and, while the thought of such technology seems primitive today, that same pursuit of aerial superiority ultimately inspired the MQ-1.
0 2/14
2018
An MQ-9 Reaper flies a training mission Oct. 18, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. MQ-9 and MQ-1 Predator aircrews helped liberate Raqqah, Syria, from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s control in early October. ISIS used the city as its capital for terrorist operations since January 2014. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) Raqqah liberated: Combat RPAs in the fight
U.S. forces, coalition partners and Syrian Democratic Forces liberated Raqqah, Syria from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s control in early October. ISIS used the city as its capital for terrorist operations since January 2014. Combat remotely piloted aircraft such as the MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper were heavily integrated during combat operations to liberate the city. RPA aircrews tirelessly flew more than 44,000 hours and employed approximately 20 percent of the coalition strike effort.
0 12/04
2017
Tech. Sgt. Christopher, 91st Attack Squadron MQ-9 Reaper sensor operator, is a reservist working with active duty and Air National Guard Airmen to enable MQ-9 airpower downrange in support of various mission sets to meet the combatant commander’s intent. These three components of the United States Air Force incorporate as a total force integration to provide 60 combat lines or 60 aircraft in the air Twenty four hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) Total Force wingmen enable MQ-1, MQ-9 mission
In the MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper community, active duty, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve Airmen incorporate as a total force integration to provide 60 combat lines or 60 aircraft in the air, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. This team of aircrew, maintenance and other career fields ensure mission success by enabling persistent strike and reconnaissance capabilities to eliminate enemies and keep ground and coalition forces safe.
0 5/31
2017
On May 9, 2017, the 15th ATKS celebrated their 100-year anniversary and reflected on the unit’s extensive and honorable heritage, which coincidentally, includes their use of airpower in nearly every major conflict of the 20th Century. This heritage is carried on in today’s fight with remotely piloted aircraft MQ-1 Predators. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class James Thompson) MQ-1 squadron celebrates 100 years
The 15th Attack Squadron patch depicting a pigeon clutching a telescope, harkens to the squadron’s long history of reconnaissance missions. On May 9, 2017, the 15th ATKS celebrated their 100-year anniversary and reflected on the unit’s extensive and honorable heritage, which coincidentally, includes their use of airpower in nearly every major conflict of the 20th Century. This heritage is carried on in today’s fight with remotely piloted aircraft MQ-1 Predators.
0 5/09
2017
The 432nd Wing celebrated their 10th anniversary at Creech Air Force Base, Nev., as a combat remotely piloted aircraft wing flying the MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper May 1, 2017. (U.S. Air Force graphic/Master Sgt. Lisa Carlson) First combat MQ-1, MQ-9 wing celebrates 10 years at Creech
The 432nd Wing celebrated their 10th anniversary at Creech Air Force Base, Nev., as a combat remotely piloted aircraft wing May 1, 2017. In attendance was Gen. Mike Holmes, commander of Air Combat Command, Col. Case Cunningham, 432nd Wing/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing commander and 400 Airmen of the wing. “Thanks for what you do,” Holmes said. “What you’ve done with this aircraft, the 3 million flight hours since 2000 with 3,000 strikes in 2016 and 10 years at this base is what we’re going to celebrate.”
0 5/03
2017
Gen. Mike Holmes, commander of Air Combat Command, speaks to the Airmen of the 432nd Wing/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing on his first visit to Creech Air Force Base, Nev., May 1, 2017. Holmes reiterated the impact of the remotely piloted aircraft enterprise in the Air Force and encouraged Airmen to continue to serve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class James Thompson) COMACC visits MQ-1, MQ-9 Airmen
Gen. Mike Holmes, commander of Air Combat Command, visited the men and women of the 432nd Wing for the first time May 1-2, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. During his visit, Holmes received a first-hand look at MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper, remotely piloted aircraft operations and the mission of 432nd WG/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing. He also spoke to the Airmen who support the mission 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year.
0 5/03
2017
The GNAT 750 was the first long-endurance remotely piloted aircraft. After it was purchased by the United States Air Force, it would evolve into the RQ-1 Predator during the 1990s to fly its first missions over the Balkans during the Kosovo conflict. (Courtesy Photo) The evolution of the combat RPA
In the 1980s, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency added modern day technology to the decades old idea of using remotely piloted aircraft for reconnaissance purposes. Little did DARPA or the Air Force know how impactful this development would be. As a result the Air Force immediately purchased a long endurance remotely piloted aircraft called the GNAT 750 resulting in the creation, production and development of the RQ-1 Predator of the early 1990s. By 1996, operators were flying intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions over the Balkans providing an eye in the sky during a period of unrest.
0 12/15
2016
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