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Default Air Force Logo NEWS RELEASE: F-16D THUNDERBIRD ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED
Excess airspeed and insufficient stopping distance on a wet runway resulted in an F-16D being overturned and destroyed upon landing at Dayton International Airport, Ohio, June 23, 2017, according to an Accident Investigation Board report released today. The pilot sustained injuries and the crewmember was uninjured.The mishap occurred after a
0 11/03
2017
Default Air Force Logo NEWS RELEASE: MQ-9A ABBREVIATED ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED
Release No: 05112017-1 Date: May 11, 2017 A pilot’s misprioritization of checklist tasks and failure to observe aircraft warnings led to the crash of an MQ-9A Reaper remotely-piloted aircraft on the Nevada Test and Training Range June 7, 2016, according to an Air Combat Command Abbreviated Accident Investigation Board report released today.
0 5/11
2017
Default Air Force Logo NEWS RELEASE: TU-2S ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED
A TU-2S crashed Sept. 20, 2016 near Sutter, Calif., during a training mission after the aircraft entered an unintentional secondary stall and the two pilots ejected, according to an Air Combat Command Accident Investigation Board report released today.During the ejection sequence, the instructor pilot, Lt. Col. Ira S. Eadie, was killed, and a
0 4/19
2017
Default Air Force Logo NEWS RELEASE: MQ-1B PREDATOR ACCIDENT REPORT RELEASED
A mechanical failure leading the engine to overheat caused the crash of an MQ-1B Predator Oct. 19, 2015, according to an Abbreviated Accident Investigation Board report released today.  The aircraft was conducting a surveillance mission in support of Operation Inherent Resolve at an undisclosed overseas location at the time of the mishap.  There
0 3/17
2017
Zach Demers, an aerospace engineer, demonstrates the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS) in an F-16 flight simulator at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, April 18. Auto GCAS, which constantly compares the aircraft's speed and position to a digital terrain map and will automatically take control if it detects an imminent ground collision, is credited with saving the lives of four pilots. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Brian Ferguson)
Point of Recovery: Ground Collision Avoidance System saving pilots lives
Frantic calls of “Two recover, Two recover, Two recover,” echoed across the airwaves. Maj. Luke O’Sullivan, F-16 Fighting Falcon instructor pilot, watched helplessly from his cockpit as his student’s jet descended from an altitude of over 3 miles to under 4,400 feet in a matter of seconds. While executing a more than 8-G turn, the over 1,000 pounds of pressure had drained the blood from the student’s brain, causing tunnel vision and impairing his ability to rationalize. Within seconds, he was a victim of gravity-induced loss of consciousness. Given the rapid rate of descent, O’Sullivan knew there was no way the pilot could regain consciousness in time to pull out of the free fall. In less than four seconds, his student would be dead — except, he didn’t die. Instead, the essentially pilotless F-16 rolled upright, pulled a 5-G climb and then leveled off. The pilot’s savior: a technology developed in the 1980s known as the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System.
0 12/09
2016
An MQ-1B Predator remotely piloted aircraft comes in for a 'touch-and-go' during a training mission, May 13, 2013. The MQ-1B Predator is an armed, multi-mission, medium-altitude, long-endurance remotely piloted aircraft that is employed primarily as an intelligence-collection asset and secondarily for munitions capability to support ground troops and base defense. (U.S. Air Force photo by 432nd Wing/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing/Released) News Release
An MQ-1B Predator was destroyed in a Oct. 17, 2015 crash after experiencing electronic systems failure and loss of control due to a lightning strike, according to an Air Combat Command Abbreviated Accident Investigation Board report released today.
0 11/02
2016
Default Air Force Logo News release
A ground control station error in the wake of a starter-generator failure led to the intentional crash of an MQ-9 Reaper remotely piloted aircraft in the CENTCOM area of responsibility Nov. 24, 2015, according to an Abbreviated Accident Investigation Board report released today. The aircraft, valued at $9.9 million, was assigned to the 432nd Wing, Creech Air Force Base, Nevada, and was destroyed on impact. There were no injuries or damage to private property.
0 7/11
2016
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