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Airman 1st Class Jordan Sili, 23d Maintenance Squadron (MXS) crew member, ties linked tube carriers together during a 30mm rounds processing, July 11, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This total force integration training with the 23d and 476th MXS allowed Airmen to work together to identify more ways to efficiently and safely conduct their mission. The munitions flight ensures the A-10C Thunderbolt IIs are armed with 30mm rounds to make sure they are able to continue their mission while at home station and deployed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) Munitions flight performs 30mm processing, keeps A-10s shooting
Airmen from the 476th and 23d Maintenance Squadron (MXS) performed a 30mm rounds processing, July 11, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This total force integration training with the 23d and 476th MXS allowed Airmen to work together to identify more ways to efficiently and safely conduct their mission. The munitions flight ensures A-10C Thunderbolt IIs are armed with 30mm rounds to make sure they are able to continue their mission while at home station and deployed.
0 7/11
2018
Default Air Force Logo Airmen trust training, save child
It was chaotic. People were screaming. There was smoke coming out of the large sports utility vehicle that was smashed against a tree at the in front of a forest. A frantic woman clenching a child panics and cries for help near the vehicle. Miraculously, three Moody Airmen with life-saving medical knowledge were in the traffic the accident caused and rushed in to help. “I ran into the woods and on the ground was this young two-year-old, just laying in the wooded area, struggling to breathe,”
0 6/06
2018
Airman 1st Class Austin Maurer, right, and Airman 1st Class Blain Gehrett, 23d Maintenance Squadron (MXS) aerospace propulsion technicians, repair a Turbo-Fan(TF)-34 engine, May 16, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The 23d MXS propulsion flight’s mission is to ensure that the A-10C Thunderbolt II TF-34 engine is in satisfactory condition before it’s even installed on the aircraft. This flight is responsible for the overall upkeep and maintenance of all TF-34 engines for the Air Force’s largest operational A-10 fighter group. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Eugene Oliver) Propulsion flight: keeps 'Warthogs' fighting
The A-10C Thunderbolt II has been flying the Air Force’s mission for over 40 years; a feat that would not be possible without the efforts of Moody’s propulsion flight. The 23d Maintenance Squadron (MXS) aerospace propulsion flight is responsible for maintaining all Turbo Fan-34 engines for the Air Force’s largest operational A-10 fighter group.
0 5/31
2018
U.S. Airmen with the 621st Contingency Response Wing (CRW) dismount a C-130 Hercules during air-land operations at the Hohenfels Training Area (Germany) in support of Swift Response 16, June 16, 2016.Rescue Airmen from the 23d Wing visited the Devil Raiders of the 621st Contingency Response Wing, May 21-23, to better understand the essential assets to stand up rescue operations from bare-base situations. (U.S. Army photo by Visual Information Specialist Gertrud Zach/released) Airmen partner toward quicker deployments
Rescue Airmen from the 23d Wing visited the Devil Raiders of the 621st Contingency Response Wing (CRW), to better understand the essential assets to stand up rescue operations from bare-base situations. Although the 23d Wing’s mission to organize, train, equip and maintain combat-ready for Air Combat Command, and the 621st CRW focuses on rapidly organizing and standing up bare bases for Air Mobility Command aircraft, they both believed they could learn from each other.
0 5/30
2018
Airman 1st Class Kornkawee Rue Art, 23d Medical Support Squadron pharmacy technician, formally a Thailand Buddhist monk, practices meditation techniques while at a temple. After spending 18 years as a monk, Rue Art traded his robes for a uniform, in his continual pursuit of a life bigger than himself; one of meaning and purpose. (Courtesy Photo) Two worlds, one way of life: former monk becomes Airman
For most people, spending a day without their phone is an impossible feat. To spend 30 days without a phone, writing, reading, talking or even eye contact would seem unfathomable, but for Thailand Buddhist monks, this is their world. After spending 18 years in that world as a monk, Airman 1st Class Kornkawee Rue Art, 23d Medical Support Squadron (MDSS) pharmacy technician, traded his robes for a uniform, in his continual pursuit of a life bigger than himself; one of meaning and purpose.
0 5/30
2018
U.S. Air Force Maj. Gen. Scott Zobrist, left, 9th Air Force commander, places a Distinguished Flying Cross medal on Capt. William “Archer” Dana, 74th Fighter Squadron A-10C Thunderbolt II pilot, during an award ceremony, May 23, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Dana, along with his wingman, was alerted Aug. 14, 2017, by a Joint Terminal Attack Controller the enemy had breached friend lines in eight locations. In a three-hour period, Dana employed 11,000 pounds of ordnance and destroyed 10 enemy defensive fighting positions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson) 74th FS pilots receive DFC
Two Airmen received the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) May 23 in recognition of their actions in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. Maj. Matthew “Chowder” Cichowski and Capt. William “Archer” Dana both, 74th Fighter Squadron A-10C Thunderbolt II pilots, risked life and limb while deployed to Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, to protect Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) from a common enemy.
0 5/25
2018
Col. Jennifer Short, 23d Wing commander, addresses Airmen from Team Moody’s operations and maintenance units during a one-day operational safety review, May 14, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During the safety review, the commander-led forum gathered feedback from Airmen who execute the Air Force's flying and maintenance operations and challenged them to identify issues that may cause a future mishap. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Snider) Moody conducts one-day operational safety review
In accordance with direction from Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. David L. Goldfein, the 23d Wing held a one-day operational safety review of all flying and maintenance functions, May 14, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The safety review followed a series of recent aviation mishaps and fatalities, including a Puerto Rico Air National Guard WC-130 Hercules crash May 2, and is part of the Air Force’s efforts to ensure the safety of its force. (Editor's note: This article has been localized by the 23d Wing Public Affairs Office; The original article can be found at http://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1514646/air-force-directs-one-day-operational-safety-review/)
0 5/15
2018
Moody Air Force Base is the first base in Air Combat Command to utilize an intensive outpatient program (IOP) on-base, allowing them to see more patients and carry a larger case load without having to feel any more overwhelmed or burdened. Moody Air Force Base’s Mental Health Flight refocused its treatment strategy, Feb. 5, by instituting a new IOP that gives Airmen the help they need from Airmen like themselves. This new program is designed to provide a more streamlined service for the nearly 7000 appointments held by the Mental Health office each year, while maintaining the quality standard of excellence for each patient. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) Mental Health trailblazes new IOP in ACC
Moody Air Force Base’s Mental Health Flight refocused its treatment strategy, Feb. 5, by instituting a new intensive outpatient program (IOP) that gives Airmen the help they need from Airmen like themselves. This new program is designed to provide a more streamlined service for the nearly 7000 appointments held by the Mental Health office each year, while maintaining the quality standard of excellence for each patient.
0 5/10
2018
Airman 1st Class Isaiah Jackson, 23d Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology journeyman, components of a table, April 25, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Metals technicians support the mission by utilizing fabrication techniques to repair and overhaul countless tools and aircraft parts. The technicians strive to exercise safe and precise fabrication techniques to be able to sufficiently handle their intense workload. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Eugene Oliver) Fabrication flight: masters in metal
Metals technicians support the mission by utilizing fabrication techniques to repair and overhaul countless tools and aircraft parts. The technicians strive to exercise safe and precise fabrication techniques to be able to sufficiently handle their intense workload.
0 5/01
2018
May is Lupus Awareness Month. Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, the most common form of lupus, is a chronic autoimmune disease that can cause severe fatigue and joint pain. Anyone can develop lupus, but it most often affects women. Lupus is also more common among African American, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. (U.S. Air Force illustration by Staff Sgt. Olivia Dominique) Lupus Awareness Month: Being visible for an invisible disease
According to the Lupus Foundation of America, I am the perfect target for a disease such as this. I am a 26 year-old black woman and one of five million people to develop a form of lupus. It’s unknown as to why women of color are three times more likely to develop lupus than Caucasians, but anyone, male or female, can fall victim.
0 5/01
2018
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