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An MQ-9 Reaper flies a training mission Oct. 18, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. MQ-9 and MQ-1 Predator aircrews helped liberate Raqqah, Syria, from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s control in early October. ISIS used the city as its capital for terrorist operations since January 2014. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) Raqqah liberated: Combat RPAs in the fight
U.S. forces, coalition partners and Syrian Democratic Forces liberated Raqqah, Syria from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria’s control in early October. ISIS used the city as its capital for terrorist operations since January 2014. Combat remotely piloted aircraft such as the MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper were heavily integrated during combat operations to liberate the city. RPA aircrews tirelessly flew more than 44,000 hours and employed approximately 20 percent of the coalition strike effort.
0 12/04
2017
Default Air Force Logo MQ-1B ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED
A mechanical failure of the left tail clamp and/or tail clamp bolts caused an MQ-1B to crash Nov. 8, 2015 in the U.S. Central Command Area of responsibility, according to an Air Combat Command Abbreviated Accident Investigation Board report released today. The MQ-1B was assigned to the 432nd Wing at Creech Air Force Base, Nevada, and operated by a launch and recovery element from the 46th Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron from a deployed location in the AOR.
0 11/21
2017
Maj. Richard, 432nd Wing MQ-1 Predator pilot, watches the Predator fly over a C-5M Supergalaxy while reminiscing how about how he became a U.S. Air Force pilot. As a seven-year-old boy, Richard fell in love with the C-5 and aviation during Lethbridge International Airshow in Alberta, Canada. More than twenty years later he became a C-5 pilot, flying for four years in that airframe. Now, he flies the MQ-1 Predator. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) Inspired by air show, boy becomes USAF pilot
Inspiration can be fleeting or it can be enduring. As seven-year-old boy, Richard felt this powerful drive during a family outing to an air show, he had no idea it would shape his future career helping him become a U.S. Air Force pilot. "Lethbridge was the first air show I went to when I was a kid,” said Maj. Richard, 432nd Wing MQ-1 Predator pilot. "We looked at all the airplanes and there wasn’t a single airplane that made more of an impression on me than the C-5 [Galaxy] did. I was just enthralled and I didn't quite know why, but even at that age I knew I wanted to be a part of it and fly it. It became my greatest dream."
0 8/03
2017
For the past 75 years, the 17th Attack Squadron Bulls have played an integral part in the defense of the nation by providing combatant commanders with reconnaissance capabilities, and more recently, with precision attack capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) Bulls celebrate 75 years of aviation excellence
For the past 75 years, the 17th Attack Squadron Bulls have played an integral part in the defense of the nation by providing combatant commanders with reconnaissance capabilities, and more recently, with precision attack capabilities. On July 23, 1942, in the midst of World War II, the 17th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron activated, and was tasked with flying the P-38 Lightning and B-25 Mitchell over the Pacific Theater, to observe and map enemy movements. After the war, the 17th transitioned to aircraft such as the RF-84 Thunderflash, the RF-101 Voodoo, and the RF-80 Shooting Star. In 1958, the squadron realigned under the 432nd Tactical Reconnaissance Wing, now known as the 432nd Wing.
0 7/24
2017
Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson shares a laugh with members of the 432nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, July 19, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. During her visit, Wilson toured the base and gained insight into the dominant persistent attack and reconnaissance mission the Airmen of the 432nd WG complete 24/7/365 for our nation and coalition partners. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Christian Clausen) SecAF gets firsthand look at MQ-1, MQ-9 mission
Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson visited Creech Air Force Base July 19, 2017 to get a closer look at the MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper mission. During her visit Wilson toured the base and gained insight into the dominant persistent attack and reconnaissance mission the Airmen of the 432nd Wing complete 24/7/365 for our nation and coalition partners.
0 7/21
2017
Lt. Gen. Mark Kelly, 12th Air Force commander, Col. Case Cunningham, outgoing 432nd Wing commander and Col. Julian Cheater, incoming 432nd Wing commander, salute during the singing of the national anthem at the 432nd Wing change of command July 6, 2017, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. During the event, Col. Cheater assumed command from Col. Cunningham in front of a crowd of Airmen, peers and family members. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class James Thompson) Premier MQ-1, MQ-9 Wing changes hands
The men and women of the leading MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper wing welcomed their new commander during the 432nd Wing change of command ceremony July 6, 2017, at Creech AFB. Col. Julian Cheater assumed command from Col. Case Cunningham in front of a crowd of Airmen, peers and family members while Lt. Gen. Mark Kelly, 12th Air Force commander, presided over the day’s ceremony. During the event, Kelly congratulated the wing on its accomplishments.
0 7/07
2017
An MQ-9 Reaper sits on the flight line Nov. 16, 2016, at Creech Air Force Base, Nev. The MQ-9 provides persistent attack and reconnaissance capabilities for combatant commanders and coalition forces involved in 24/7/365 combat operations abroad. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class James Thompson)  Cleared hot: When predators and reapers engage
Following the mission brief and pre-flight checks, an aircrew consisting of an officer pilot in command and a career enlisted aviator sensor operator observe a target in an area of responsibility overseas from a cockpit in the United States and waits for the green light from a joint terminal attack controller on the ground. Anticipation heightens as the JTAC confirms the target and gives the aircrew the clearance to attack. The aircrew then reviews checklists before engaging, adrenaline begins to seep in and the whirring from electronic components in the cockpit recedes from awareness. Their concentration sharpens and as the pilot squeezes the trigger, and a laser guided AGM-114 Hellfire missile is released. The sensor operator hones in on the objective at hand by keeping the laser designator crosshairs precisely over the target and guiding the missile. The countdown begins until impact...10, 9, 8…
0 6/09
2017
The 432nd Wing celebrated their 10th anniversary at Creech Air Force Base, Nev., as a combat remotely piloted aircraft wing flying the MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper May 1, 2017. (U.S. Air Force graphic/Master Sgt. Lisa Carlson) First combat MQ-1, MQ-9 wing celebrates 10 years at Creech
The 432nd Wing celebrated their 10th anniversary at Creech Air Force Base, Nev., as a combat remotely piloted aircraft wing May 1, 2017. In attendance was Gen. Mike Holmes, commander of Air Combat Command, Col. Case Cunningham, 432nd Wing/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing commander and 400 Airmen of the wing. “Thanks for what you do,” Holmes said. “What you’ve done with this aircraft, the 3 million flight hours since 2000 with 3,000 strikes in 2016 and 10 years at this base is what we’re going to celebrate.”
0 5/03
2017
In 2016, 432nd Wing/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing MQ-1B Predator and MQ-9 Reaper aircrews assisted coalition partners in the reclamation of Manbij, Syria, from Islamic State of Iraq and Syria forces. Pilots and sensor operators assigned to squadrons across the 432nd Wing and the 432nd Air Expeditionary Wing provided the close air support and reconnaissance needed for coalition partners to drive ISIS fighters out of the city. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Christian Clausen) MQ-1, MQ-9 aircrews help liberate Manbij
In 2016 MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper aircrews assisted coalition partners in the reclamation of Manbij, Syria, from Islamic State of Iraq and Syria forces. Pilots and sensor operators assigned to squadrons across the 432nd Wing and the 432nd Air Expeditionary Wing provided the close air support and reconnaissance needed for coalition partners to drive ISIS fighters out of the city.
0 4/05
2017
An MQ-1 Predator taxies under water from a fire hose during its final flight Feb. 27, 2017 at Holloman Air Force N.M. The MQ-1 Predator has provided many years of service and is being phased out of service as the Air Force transitions to the more capable MQ-9 Reaper. The MQ-1 Predator is an armed, multi-mission, medium-altitude, long-endurance remotely piloted aircraft that is employed primarily as an intelligence-collection asset and secondarily against dynamic execution targets.  (U.S. Air Force Photo by Staff Sgt. Stacy Jonsgaard) Fighting 49ers say farewell to Predator
Holloman Air Force Base retired its MQ-1 mission Feb. 27, 2017 during a ceremony here.
0 2/27
2017
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