News Search

FILTER:
crash
Clear

News Comments Updated
1 2
Col. Jennifer Short, 23d Wing commander, addresses Airmen from Team Moody’s operations and maintenance units during a one-day operational safety review, May 14, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During the safety review, the commander-led forum gathered feedback from Airmen who execute the Air Force's flying and maintenance operations and challenged them to identify issues that may cause a future mishap. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Snider) Moody conducts one-day operational safety review
In accordance with direction from Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. David L. Goldfein, the 23d Wing held a one-day operational safety review of all flying and maintenance functions, May 14, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The safety review followed a series of recent aviation mishaps and fatalities, including a Puerto Rico Air National Guard WC-130 Hercules crash May 2, and is part of the Air Force’s efforts to ensure the safety of its force. (Editor's note: This article has been localized by the 23d Wing Public Affairs Office; The original article can be found at http://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1514646/air-force-directs-one-day-operational-safety-review/)
0 5/15
2018
Default Air Force Logo Air Force directs one-day operational safety review
Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. David L. Goldfein directed all Air Force wings with flying and maintenance functions to execute a one-day operational safety review by May 21, 2018.
0 5/08
2018
Default Air Force Logo MQ-1B ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED
A mechanical failure of the left tail clamp and/or tail clamp bolts caused an MQ-1B to crash Nov. 8, 2015 in the U.S. Central Command Area of responsibility, according to an Air Combat Command Abbreviated Accident Investigation Board report released today. The MQ-1B was assigned to the 432nd Wing at Creech Air Force Base, Nevada, and operated by a launch and recovery element from the 46th Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron from a deployed location in the AOR.
0 11/21
2017
Default Air Force Logo NEWS RELEASE: MQ-9A ABBREVIATED ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED
Release No: 05112017-1 Date: May 11, 2017 A pilot’s misprioritization of checklist tasks and failure to observe aircraft warnings led to the crash of an MQ-9A Reaper remotely-piloted aircraft on the Nevada Test and Training Range June 7, 2016, according to an Air Combat Command Abbreviated Accident Investigation Board report released today.
0 5/11
2017
Default Air Force Logo NEWS RELEASE: TU-2S ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED
A TU-2S crashed Sept. 20, 2016 near Sutter, Calif., during a training mission after the aircraft entered an unintentional secondary stall and the two pilots ejected, according to an Air Combat Command Accident Investigation Board report released today.During the ejection sequence, the instructor pilot, Lt. Col. Ira S. Eadie, was killed, and a
0 4/19
2017
Default Air Force Logo NEWS RELEASE: MQ-1B PREDATOR ACCIDENT REPORT RELEASED
A mechanical failure leading the engine to overheat caused the crash of an MQ-1B Predator Oct. 19, 2015, according to an Abbreviated Accident Investigation Board report released today.  The aircraft was conducting a surveillance mission in support of Operation Inherent Resolve at an undisclosed overseas location at the time of the mishap.  There
0 3/17
2017
Maj. Alex Turner, Thunderbird 6, performs a sneak pass over the crowd during the March Air Reserve Base Airfest "Thunder Over the Empire" air show at March ARB, Calif., April 17, 2016. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Tech. Sgt. Christopher Boitz) F-16CM THUNDERBIRD ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED
A throttle trigger malfunction and inadvertent throttle rotation resulted in an F-16CM being destroyed upon impacting the ground south of Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, June 2, 2016, according to an Accident Investigation Board report released today. The Thunderbird pilot ejected and sustained a minor injury.
0 12/14
2016
Zach Demers, an aerospace engineer, demonstrates the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS) in an F-16 flight simulator at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, April 18. Auto GCAS, which constantly compares the aircraft's speed and position to a digital terrain map and will automatically take control if it detects an imminent ground collision, is credited with saving the lives of four pilots. (U.S. Air Force photo/Master Sgt. Brian Ferguson)
Point of Recovery: Ground Collision Avoidance System saving pilots lives
Frantic calls of “Two recover, Two recover, Two recover,” echoed across the airwaves. Maj. Luke O’Sullivan, F-16 Fighting Falcon instructor pilot, watched helplessly from his cockpit as his student’s jet descended from an altitude of over 3 miles to under 4,400 feet in a matter of seconds. While executing a more than 8-G turn, the over 1,000 pounds of pressure had drained the blood from the student’s brain, causing tunnel vision and impairing his ability to rationalize. Within seconds, he was a victim of gravity-induced loss of consciousness. Given the rapid rate of descent, O’Sullivan knew there was no way the pilot could regain consciousness in time to pull out of the free fall. In less than four seconds, his student would be dead — except, he didn’t die. Instead, the essentially pilotless F-16 rolled upright, pulled a 5-G climb and then leveled off. The pilot’s savior: a technology developed in the 1980s known as the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System.
0 12/09
2016
Default Air Force Logo NEWS RELEASE: F-16 MIDAIR COLLISION ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED
An F-16CM and a Cessna 150M collided on July 7, 2015 near Moncks Corner, S.C., due to both pilots’ inability to see and avoid the other aircraft, and direction given by the air traffic controller, according to an Air Combat Command Accident Investigation Board report released today.
0 12/09
2016
Default Air Force Logo U-2 crashes near Sutter Buttes
An Air Force U-2 Dragon Lady crashed shortly after takeoff at approximately 9:05 a.m. Sept. 20 near the Sutter Buttes.One pilot is confirmed deceased, while the other sustained injuries.The aircraft was assigned to 1st Reconnaissance Squadron, Beale Air Force Base, California, and was on a training mission. Two pilots were on board and ejected from
0 9/20
2016
1 2
RSS