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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Svoleantopoulos, 497th Operation Support Squadron weapons tactician, stands by the Shellbank Fitness Center’s pool at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, March 14, 2018. JBLE Airman overcomes struggle by paying it forward
As he drove home on an overcast winter’s day, an incessant flood of overly critical thoughts fueled feelings of defeat that consumed every moment since the blow horn was pressed to signal, “I quit.” U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Svoleantopoulos, 497th Operations Support Squadron weapons tactician, returned from the U.S. Air Force Pararescue Indoctrination Course much sooner than he anticipated.
0 3/21
2018
Tech. Sgt. Dallas Ayers, 823d Base Defense Squadron assistant flight chief, poses for a photo March 6, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Ayers is preparing to make the transition from protecting lives in combat to honoring the Air Force. He was recently selected for the U.S. Air Force Honor Guard and will begin his honor guard technical school April 16. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) Airman soars to new heights with Air Force Honor Guard
Airmen are called to serve in a range of ways. In one facet of service, the United States Air Force Honor Guard ensures a legacy of Airmen who protect the standards, perfect the image and preserve the heritage at the highest echelon of professionalism. On the other side of the spectrum- Battlefield Airmen are always ready to deploy while maintaining combat and specialty training standards matched only by their profound sense of discipline and loyalty.
0 3/13
2018
A member of the British Royal Air Force shares tactical points with Airmen from the 824th Base Defense Squadron during close-quarters battle training, Feb. 28, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The 820th Base Defense Group welcomed a member of the British Royal Air Force to embed into multiple training situations to help strengthen combined operations between U.S. and British forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Snider) RAF trainer instructs CQB tactics
The 820th BDG teamed with British Royal Air Force Sgt. Glenn Risebrow,15th Squadron senior noncommissioned officer in charge of training, in multiple training scenarios to help strengthen combined operations between U.S. and British forces.
0 3/01
2018
Families and friends wait for their loved ones to exit a C-17 Globemaster III during a redeployment, Jan. 23, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Airmen from the 74th Fighter Squadron and 23d Maintenance Group returned home after a seven-month deployment in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Snider) Warfighters return to loved ones
During the seven-month deployment the 74th Fighter Squadron flew more than 1,700 sorties, employed weapons over 4,400 times, destroyed 2,300 targets and killed 2,800 insurgents.
0 1/30
2018
Airman 1st Class Evan Valance, 23d Logistics Readiness Squadron fuels distribution operator, carries gear and food to an M-11 refueling truck before conducting HH-60G Pave Hawk hot-pit refueling operations, Jan. 16, 2018 at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Airmen who work in the petroleum, oils and lubricants (POL) flight frequently use hot pit refueling, which is a more efficient tactic that allows aircrews a quick transition from the flight line back to their current objective. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Snider) POL enables faster turnarounds, longer missions
“With hot-pit refuels we’re prepositioned and they taxi to us and with the engines still running,” said Tech. Sgt. Zachary Beggin, 23d LRS NCO in charge of fuels distribution. “They hookup, refuel and their back up in the air and it decreases ground time by 66 percent.” Less ground time means more time in the air and in the mission. This tactic equips aircrews with the ability to push the operations tempo and also minimize the demand for maintenance support.
0 1/18
2018
Airman 1st Class Calvin Love, left, 23d Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection technician, talks with Col. Jay Vietas, 23d Medical Group commander, on Christmas Day in the Georgia Pines Dining Facility, Dec. 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The Christmas meal was an opportunity for Airmen, retirees, dependents and leadership to enjoy a traditional Christmas meal. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) Team Moody brings holiday spirit to DFAC
Leadership from Moody Air Force Base came to the Georgia Pines Dining Facility to serve the annual Christmas meal, Dec. 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The meal was an opportunity for Airmen, retirees, dependents and leadership to enjoy a traditional Christmas meal.
0 12/25
2017
Airman 1st Class Heather Chambers, 23d Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology journeyman, plasma cuts a steel plate, Dec. 19, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Metals technology technicians strive for perfection when fabricating and repairing Team Moody’s aircraft and equipment to ensure they maintain their continual high ops tempo. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) Metals tech: perfection in precision
Precision is the name of the game for the metals technicians, who must abide by the welding and machinery measuring tolerance of three thousandths of an inch, which is approximately the width of a human hair. The 23d Maintenance Squadron’s (MXS) aircraft metals technology technicians strive for perfection when fabricating and repairing Team Moody’s aircraft and equipment to ensure they maintain their continual high ops tempo.
0 12/22
2017
A South Georgian youth overlooks the skies as he co-pilots a Piper Archer aircraft during the Eyes Above the Horizon diversity outreach program, July 22, 2017, in Valdosta, Ga. Moody Airmen, service members nationwide and collegiate representatives taught approximately 100 10-19-year-olds about aviation as they took the Valdosta skies to commemorate the 76th Anniversary of the historic Tuskegee Airmen. The program focuses on mentoring and familiarizing underrepresented minorities with basic flying fundamentals. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Greg Nash) Moody Airmen earn national community volunteer award
Three Moody Airmen were recognized during the 2017 National Public Benefit Flying Awards, Nov. 29, in Arlington, Va. Taking home the Distinguished Volunteer award, these Airmen hosted the largest Legacy Flight Academy’s “Eyes Above the Horizon” youth aviation diversity outreach event in honor of the Tuskegee Airmen. This past summer, they gave approximately 100 South Georgian youth a chance to fly and explore aviation and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics career opportunities.
0 12/21
2017
Spices rest on a rack in the Georgia Pines Dining Facility (DFAC), Dec. 12, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Through teamwork, adaption and striving for excellence, the Georgia Pines DFAC Airmen are able to ensure Team Moody is fed and ready to finish the fight. (U.S. Air Force Base photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) DFAC services: Bringing the heat, feeding the force
When it comes to winning a war, victory can fall on which “army’s” troops are fed. To feed an Air Force, the Dining Facility Airmen bring the heat to their battleground: the kitchen. Through teamwork, adaption and striving for excellence, the Georgia Pines DFAC Airmen are able to ensure Team Moody is fed and ready to finish the fight.
0 12/15
2017
An A-10C Thunderbolt II taxis toward a hot-pit refueling point, Dec. 8, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Team Moody uses this style of refueling to eliminate the need of extra maintenance and to extend pilot’s training time per flight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Snider) Hot-pit refueling enables high-ops training
The 23d Logistics Readiness Squadron’s Petroleum, Oil, Lubricant section kept aircraft flying around the clock by conducting the more efficient hot-pit styled refuels, Dec. 4 -7, during the 23d Wing’s Phase 1, Phase 2 exercise, here. “Hot pits are almost like a gas station attendant,” said Master Sgt. James Holloway, 23d LRS fuel’s superintendent. “With a max surge like this, if we cold serviced, it would take a lot longer.
0 12/13
2017
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