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AFE Airmen are responsible for ensuring the aircrews gear is in top-notch condition before takeoff. Aircrew Flight Equipment airmen save lives
When aircrew take to the skies, they have to be focused and that focus needs to be clear in case of an emergency. There isn’t time to worry if the lifesaving gear they’re wearing will hold up when needed. The Airmen responsible for this equipment ensure the gear is in top-notch condition before the aircrew even step on the flightline.
0 1/04
2018
Default Air Force Logo 53rd Wing F-35s perform Rose Parade flyover
Flyover honors former pilot.
0 1/02
2018
Airman 1st Class Calvin Love, left, 23d Maintenance Squadron nondestructive inspection technician, talks with Col. Jay Vietas, 23d Medical Group commander, on Christmas Day in the Georgia Pines Dining Facility, Dec. 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The Christmas meal was an opportunity for Airmen, retirees, dependents and leadership to enjoy a traditional Christmas meal. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) Team Moody brings holiday spirit to DFAC
Leadership from Moody Air Force Base came to the Georgia Pines Dining Facility to serve the annual Christmas meal, Dec. 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The meal was an opportunity for Airmen, retirees, dependents and leadership to enjoy a traditional Christmas meal.
0 12/25
2017
Airman 1st Class Heather Chambers, 23d Maintenance Squadron aircraft metals technology journeyman, plasma cuts a steel plate, Dec. 19, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Metals technology technicians strive for perfection when fabricating and repairing Team Moody’s aircraft and equipment to ensure they maintain their continual high ops tempo. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) Metals tech: perfection in precision
Precision is the name of the game for the metals technicians, who must abide by the welding and machinery measuring tolerance of three thousandths of an inch, which is approximately the width of a human hair. The 23d Maintenance Squadron’s (MXS) aircraft metals technology technicians strive for perfection when fabricating and repairing Team Moody’s aircraft and equipment to ensure they maintain their continual high ops tempo.
0 12/22
2017
.S. Air Force Maj. Paul “Loco” Lopez, U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor Demonstration Team pilot, completed a qualification performance for U.S. Air Force Gen. Mike Holmes, Commander of Air Combat Command, to certify his capabilities as a demo team pilot at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Dec. 18, 2017. F-22 Raptor Demo Team receive COMACC qualification
U.S. Air Force Maj. Paul “Loco” Lopez, U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor Demonstration Team pilot, completed a qualification performance for U.S. Air Force Gen. Mike Holmes, Commander of Air Combat Command, to certify his capabilities as a demo team pilot at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Dec. 18, 2017.
0 12/21
2017
The tail hook on an F-15C Eagle catches the cable of an arresting system, Dec. 19, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The BAK-12 arresting system is used on the runway to slow down fighter aircraft in emergency situations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson) BAK-12 brakes jets
A fighter jet is soaring through the sky during a routine training mission when the pilot notices something is wrong. She radios the control tower announcing she’s preparing for an emergency landing. Approaching the runway, she turns off the engines and drops a tail hook that will catch a braking system on the runway, safely slowing down the aircraft. This assembly is called a BAK-12 arresting system and after 10 years and new guidance, Moody’s 23d Civil Engineer Squadron power production shop is replacing every part of the system on the runway.
0 12/20
2017
Master Sgt. Adam Young, 124th Operations Support Squadron Survival, Evasion, Resist and Escape specialist, demonstrates evasion techniques during Gunfighter Flag 18-1 Dec. 14, 2017, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. Gunfighter Flag 18-1 took place Dec. 11-15, simulating joint service operations that might be encountered in a deployed environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jeremy D. Wolff) Military branches come together for combat training
The 366th Fighter Wing is located in the middle of nowhere in southern Idaho, nearly an hour away from a large city. Not exactly the description of a place one would expect military forces from every U.S. service and foreign allies would be excited to visit. In reality, Mountain Home AFB’s 110,000-acre range provides an ideal training setting with one of the biggest air spaces in the country, for exercises like Gunfighter Flag that accommodate joint-service combat training to simulate deployed situations.
0 12/19
2017
Spices rest on a rack in the Georgia Pines Dining Facility (DFAC), Dec. 12, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Through teamwork, adaption and striving for excellence, the Georgia Pines DFAC Airmen are able to ensure Team Moody is fed and ready to finish the fight. (U.S. Air Force Base photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) DFAC services: Bringing the heat, feeding the force
When it comes to winning a war, victory can fall on which “army’s” troops are fed. To feed an Air Force, the Dining Facility Airmen bring the heat to their battleground: the kitchen. Through teamwork, adaption and striving for excellence, the Georgia Pines DFAC Airmen are able to ensure Team Moody is fed and ready to finish the fight.
0 12/15
2017
Default Air Force Logo “USAF depends on Foreign Area Officers to strengthen international partnerships and alliances”
The Department of Defense and the Air Force have placed renewed emphasis on professionalizing the security cooperation enterprise, as indicated in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017. This decision highlights defense leadership’s resolve to more effectively build alliances with international partners.
0 12/14
2017
An A-10C Thunderbolt II taxis toward a hot-pit refueling point, Dec. 8, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Team Moody uses this style of refueling to eliminate the need of extra maintenance and to extend pilot’s training time per flight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Snider) Hot-pit refueling enables high-ops training
The 23d Logistics Readiness Squadron’s Petroleum, Oil, Lubricant section kept aircraft flying around the clock by conducting the more efficient hot-pit styled refuels, Dec. 4 -7, during the 23d Wing’s Phase 1, Phase 2 exercise, here. “Hot pits are almost like a gas station attendant,” said Master Sgt. James Holloway, 23d LRS fuel’s superintendent. “With a max surge like this, if we cold serviced, it would take a lot longer.
0 12/13
2017
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