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Hurricane Information 2012 Hurricane Information 2012

According to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration, rhe Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1st to November 30th, and the Eastern Pacific hurricane season runs from May 15th to November 30th. The Atlantic basin includes the Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, and Gulf of Mexico.  The Atlantic hurricane region includes the North Atlantic Ocean, the Caribbean Sea, and the Gulf of Mexico. Do not wait until a hurricane to develop a plan for survival.

 

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tabLangley Hurricane Conditions 
HURCON 4: 
Hurricane Condition 4 is declared when the forecast calls for the arrival of a tropical storm with 50-knot (58 mph) sustained winds or greater within 72 hours

HURCON 3:

Hurricane Condition 3 is declared when the forecast calls for the arrival of a tropical storm with 50-knot (58 mph) sustained winds or greater within 48 hours

HURCON 2:

Hurricane Condition 2 is declared when the forecast calls for the arrival of a tropical storm with 50-knot (58 mph) sustained winds or greater within 24 hours.

HURCON 1:
Hurricane Condition 1 is when the forecast calls for the arrival of a tropical storm with 50-knot (58 mph) sustained winds or greater within 12 hours.
tabSaffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale 
The Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale is a 1-5 rating based on the hurricane's present intensity. This is used to give an estimate of the potential property damage and flooding expected along the coast from a hurricane landfall. Wind speed is the determining factor in the scale, as storm surge values are highly dependent on the slope of the continental shelf and the shape of the coastline, in the landfall region.

Category One Hurricane:
Winds 74-95 mph (64-82 kt or 119-153 km/hr). Storm surge generally 4-5 ft above normal. No real damage to building structures. Damage primarily to unanchored mobile homes, shrubbery, and trees. Some damage to poorly constructed signs. Also, some coastal road flooding and minor pier damage.

Category Two Hurricane:
Winds 96-110 mph (83-95 kt or 154-177 km/hr). Storm surge generally 6-8 feet above normal. Some roofing material, door, and window damage of buildings. Considerable damage to shrubbery and trees with some trees blown down. Considerable damage to mobile homes, poorly constructed signs, and piers. Coastal and low-lying escape routes flood 2-4 hours before arrival of the hurricane center. Small craft in unprotected anchorages break moorings. Hurricane Frances of 2004 made landfall over the southern end of Hutchinson Island, Florida as a Category Two hurricane. Hurricane Isabel of 2003 made landfall near Drum Inlet on the Outer Banks of North Carolina as a Category 2 hurricane.

Category Three Hurricane:
Winds 111-130 mph (96-113 kt or 178-209 km/hr). Storm surge generally 9-12 ft above normal. Some structural damage to small residences and utility buildings with a minor amount of curtainwall failures. Damage to shrubbery and trees with foliage blown off trees and large trees blown down. Mobile homes and poorly constructed signs are destroyed. Low-lying escape routes are cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the center of the hurricane. Flooding near the coast destroys smaller structures with larger structures damaged by battering from floating debris. Terrain continuously lower than 5 ft above mean sea level may be flooded inland 8 miles (13 km) or more. Evacuation of low-lying residences with several blocks of the shoreline may be required.

Category Four Hurricane:
Winds 131-155 mph (114-135 kt or 210-249 km/hr). Storm surge generally 13-18 ft above normal. More extensive curtainwall failures with some complete roof structure failures on small residences. Shrubs, trees, and all signs are blown down. Complete destruction of mobile homes. Extensive damage to doors and windows. Low-lying escape routes may be cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the center of the hurricane. Major damage to lower floors of structures near the shore. Terrain lower than 10 ft above sea level may be flooded requiring massive evacuation of residential areas as far inland as 6 miles (10 km).

Category Five Hurricane:
Winds greater than 155 mph (135 kt or 249 km/hr). Storm surge generally greater than 18 ft above normal. Complete roof failure on many residences and industrial buildings. Some complete building failures with small utility buildings blown over or away. All shrubs, trees, and signs blown down. Complete destruction of mobile homes. Severe and extensive window and door damage. Low-lying escape routes are cut by rising water 3-5 hours before arrival of the center of the hurricane. Major damage to lower floors of all structures located less than 15 ft above sea level and within 500 yards of the shoreline. Massive evacuation of residential areas on low ground within 5-10 miles (8-16 km) of the shoreline may be required. Only 3 Category Five Hurricanes have made landfall in the United States since records began.

Source: National Hurricane Center
tabTips: before, during and after  
tabLangley Evacuation Routes 
VDOT Hurricane Guide
tabHampton Roads Links 
tabVirginia Emergency Managment Contacts 
Accomack -- (757) 787-0900
Chesapeake -- (757) 382-6464
Chincoteague -- (757) 336-6519
Franklin -- (757) 562-8581
Gloucester -- (804) 693-1390
Hampton -- (757) 727-6414
Isle of Wight -- (757) 357-2151
James City -- (757) 566-0112
Newport News -- (757) 269-2900
Norfolk -- (757) 441-5600
Northampton -- (757) 678-0443
Poquoson -- (757) 868-3501
Portsmouth -- (757) 393-8551
Southampton -- (757) 653-2100
Suffolk -- (757) 923-2110
Surry -- (757) 294-5264
Virginia Beach -- (757) 427-4228
Williamsburg -- (757) 220-6220
York -- (757) 890-3600
tabOther Hurricane Links 
FEMA for Kids -- Hurricanes
Federal Emergency Management Agency
Prepare Hampton Roads
Safe & Well List
National Hurricane Center
NASA Hurricane Info

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tabHurricane Terms
Tropical Depression
An organized system of clouds and thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 38 MPH (33 knots) or less. Sustained winds are defined as one-minute average wind measured at about 33 ft (10 meters) above the surface.

Tropical Storm
An organized system of strong thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 39-73 MPH (34-63 knots).

Hurricane
An intense tropical weather system of strong thunderstorms with a well-defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 74 MPH (64 knots) or higher.

Storm Surge
A dome of water pushed onshore by hurricane and tropical storm winds. Storm surges can reach 25 feet high and be 50-1000 miles wide.

Storm Tide
A combination of storm surge and the normal tide (i.e., a 15-foot storm surge combined with a 2-foot normal high tide over the mean sea level created a 17-foot storm tide).

Hurricane/Tropical Storm Watch
Hurricane/tropical storm conditions are possible in the specified area, usually within 36 hours. Tune in to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information.

Hurricane/Tropical Storm Warning
Hurricane/tropical storm conditions are expected in the specified area, usually within 24 hours.

Short Term Watches and Warnings
These warnings provide detailed information about specific hurricane threats, such as flash floods and tornadoes.

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