Air Combat Command   Right Corner Banner
Join the Air Force

News > 14th CMSAF visits Moody, honors new chiefs
 
Photos
Previous ImageNext Image
One of Moody’s very own
Retired Chief Master Sgt. Gerald Murray, the 14th Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force from 2002 to 2006, gives remarks during a chief recognition ceremony Jan. 12, 2013, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Murray was also the 347th Rescue Wing command chief master sergeant at Moody from 1996 to 1999. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Jamal D. Sutter/Released)
Download HiRes
14th CMSAF visits Moody, honors new chiefs

Posted 1/15/2013   Updated 1/15/2013 Email story   Print story

    


by Staff Sgt. Jamal D. Sutter
23d Wing Public Affairs


1/15/2013 - MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. -- One of the most notable Airmen to ever come out of Moody Air Force Base, Ga., helped honor the base's newest chief master sergeants during recognition ceremony Jan. 12.

Retired Chief Master Sgt. Gerald Murray, the 14th Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force from 2002 to 2006 and the 347th Rescue Wing command chief master sergeant at Moody from 1996 to 1999, spoke at the ceremony to give words of wisdom to the honorees.

Recognized were Chief Master Sgt. Maxie Gainey, Chief Master Sgt. Jeffery Leemon Sr., Senior Master Sgt. Roy Clayton, Senior Master Sgt. Kimberly Turner, Senior Master Sgt. Gina Thursby and Senior Master Sgt. Ryan Schultz who is currently deployed to Afghanistan.

"Can you be a better leader as a chief master sergeant?" Murray asked as he first addressed the honorees. "I'll make that a statement. You can be a better leader as a chief master sergeant."

Throughout his speech, Murray shared his views on what it takes to be a leader and highlighted some of his favorite pieces of Air Force literature that describe great leadership values.

"Why do Airmen follow your lead?" he asked. "Or stated another way, why should Airmen follow your lead as a chief master sergeant?"

Murray said that explaining to Airmen why they should follow you as opposed to how they should, inspires them. He also touched on the 360-degree leadership theory and how effective leaders lead upward by motivating superiors, across by working fluently with peers and downward by mentoring younger Airmen.

"I used to say it, and I still say this," he said. "I believe we grow more in the rank of chief master sergeant than in any rank that we've ever held in the service. It is incredible, the growth that we as Airmen have to have and you will have as chief master sergeants."

Murray also took some time to highlight recent documents released by the Chief of Staff of the Air Force Gen. Mark Welsh III and Secretary of the Air Force Michael Donley where they both spoke on current and future Air Force priorities, and the challenges Airmen may face for the next few years.

"We're a smaller Air Force today," Murray said. "I was in an Air Force that had almost 700,000 active-duty Airmen. Today, you're at 329,000, and yet we are likely to get even smaller. Go read what the secretary says and how you're going to have to posture and what's going to have to be done."

Col. Billy Thompson, 23d Wing commander, presided over the event and also had words to share with the inductees during his closing remarks.

"I'm truly honored to be standing here and serving this great Air Force with each of you," Thompson said. "Some of us are in positions and by nature of having those positions, we have certain responsibilities and certain things are expected of us. I believe that in the rank of chief master sergeant, regardless of the position you hold, people look to you for leadership. You have truly joined a group of the top one percent of the enlisted force structure, and you've earned it."



tabComments
No comments yet.  
Add a comment

 Inside ACC

ima cornerSearch


Site Map      Contact Us     Questions     USA.gov     Security and Privacy notice     E-publishing  
Suicide Prevention    SAPR   IG   EEO   Accessibility/Section 508   No FEAR Act