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U.S. Air Force and Royal Air Force joint terminal attack controllers communicate with 23d Fighter Group A-10C Thunderbolt IIs overhead during a close air support training exercise, July 26, 2017, in Lakeland, Ga. Two RAF members recently spent time with the 93d Air Ground Operations Wing to compare and contrast how each entity conducts business and to plan future coalition training events. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Royal Air Force JTACs integrate with US counterparts
Members of the United Kingdom’s Royal Air Force recently spent time immersing with the 93d Air Ground Operations Wing at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The NATO allies visiting were Joint Terminal Attack Controllers tasked with building stronger ties with the 93d AGOW in hopes of future integration opportunities.
0 8/03
2017
Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt, 23d Wing photojournalist, simulates a field sobriety test, July 7, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. When an Airman receives a driving under the influence charge, they are eligible to receive both a civilian conviction if caught off base, as well as a punishment given at their commander’s discretion. The final sentence could cost thousands of dollars in fines, suspension of their license, negative paperwork, administrative demotion, and possible loss of career or reclassification. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Airman 1st Class Lauren M. Sprunk) DUI: What it really costs
Airman A epitomized what every stellar Airman should be. He passed every test with flying colors, volunteered during his free time, and went above and beyond during his everyday job. He had just received Senior Airman below-the-zone, a promotion given six months early, and went out to celebrate. Before he knew it, red and blue lights were flashing behind him. Through blurry eyes, he attempted to walk in a straight line and blow through a breathalyzer, the number flashing back was beyond the legal limit. Airman A had thought he was fine after the few drinks he had that night but he quickly learned what those drinks would really cost him.
0 7/07
2017
Moody Chiefs pose for a photo during a promotion ceremony, June 28, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During the ceremony, then Maj. Christopher Dunston, 723d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron commander, promoted to lieutenant colonel and his younger cousin, then Senior Master Sgt. Brandon Dunston, 74th Aircraft Maintenance Unit superintendent, promoted to chief master sergeant. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Lauren M. Sprunk) Cousins climb through AF ranks together
“If he was a plumber, I would’ve been one too.” He always idolized his older cousin, he was the one that taught him how to ride a bike and how to swim. So when he watched him leave for the Air Force, he knew that was what he was going to do one day. Although separated by miles, their relationship remained close as his older cousin continued to guide him. Now, they have returned to each other’s side, both stationed at Moody, providing them with a unique opportunity.
0 7/05
2017
Staff Sgt. James Baker, 71st Rescue Squadron loadmaster, reunites with his fiancé, Emily Jobson, after returning from a deployment in Southwest Asia, June 7, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The 71st RQS provided expeditionary personnel recovery in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. (U.S. photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) Four rescue squadrons deploy, return together
Rescue Airmen of the 23d Wing recently returned from a deployment where they provided around the clock personnel recovery coverage in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. Working together to ensure that someone’s worst day wasn’t their last day, the 71st, 41st, 48th and 55th Rescue Squadrons provided the airborne and ground components for U.S. Central Command’s personnel recovery operations. “One thing that set this deployment apart from others that I’ve been on is that all three Rescue [components], the HC-130, HH-60 and Guardian Angels, were together in a single location,” said Lt. Col. Michael Thompson, 71st RQS director of operations. “We planned and executed together as a cohesive rescue team. “We were on alert 24/7 to ensure that if there is ever an Airman, Sailor, Marine, or Soldier who is isolated, we are prepared to return them to friendly control,” added Thompson.
0 6/15
2017
Senior Master Sgt. Jeffrey Schillawski, 71st Aircraft Maintenance Unit superintendent, embraces his son, Noah, during a redeployment, June 6, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The 41st and 71st Rescue Squadrons were recently deployed to Southwest Asia where they provided combat search and rescue capabilities in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Lauren M. Sprunk) Rescue Airmen return home
Members of the 41st and 71st Rescue Squadrons returned home from a deployment in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, 5-9 June. The 41st and 71st RQSs were responsible for conducting combat search and rescue missions ensuring that someone’s worst day isn’t their last day.
0 6/13
2017
Airman 1st Class Homer Holland, 822d Base Defense Squadron fireteam member, carries an unconscious team member during a simulated explosives and hazardous material scenario, May 24, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The exercise simulated initial responses from first responders who then contacted other appropriate units after assessing the potential threat while also assisting the simulated victims of hazardous materials. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Airmen, FBI partner for training
Members of Team Moody and the FBI partnered for roadside bomb and weapons of mass destruction training May 22-25, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The training brought to light the similarities and differences between the two bomb management teams.
0 6/01
2017
Senior Airman Kristen Aubrey, 23d Medical Operations Squadron aerospace medical technician, inspects a simulated patient's ear, May 4, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. After recognizing a patient with life-threatening symptoms, Aubrey was honored for quickly responding to a potentially dire situation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Medical technicians care for greatest assets
Medical technicians are normally the first to see a patient, leaving it to them to assess if someone is simply sick or should be in an emergency room. After recognizing a patient with life-threatening symptoms, one of Team Moody’s medical technicians was recently honored for quickly responding to a potentially dire situation. “I knew right away I needed to let the provider know and figure out what we were going to do for them,” said Senior Airman Kristen Aubrey, 23d Medical Operations Squadron aerospace medical technician. “We called and made them go to the ER right away because it could have been the onset of another heart attack.”
0 5/10
2017
A unit trainer sprays Airman 1st Class Hunter Ogle, 23d Security Forces Squadron entry controller, in the face with oleoresin capsicum spray, also known as pepper spray, during an initial confidence course, May 2, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Airmen must complete a class then pass a physical confidence course while experiencing the effects of oleoresin capsicum spray to be qualified to carry the less-than-lethal tool. (Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Defender prevails, despite pepper spray
Airmen must complete a class then pass a physical confidence course while experiencing the effects of oleoresin capsicum spray to be qualified to carry the less-than-lethal tool.
0 5/04
2017
Airman 1st Class Mary Amstead, 23d Wing Judge Advocate general law paralegal, poses with an assortment of alcohol bottles, April 26, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The Air Force expresses the importance of having outlets for the stressors of military life. (U.S. Air Force illustration by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Airman battles alcoholism, prevails
“I was in a ball crying and saying, ‘I need help.’ My wife didn’t know what to do. I’d already been through in-patient once, and she didn’t know how to fix me.” After relapsing and turning back to the bottle, Staff Sgt. Jaiopalanta Jones, 23d Equipment Maintenance Squadron aerospace ground equipment technician, later checked himself into in-patient care. This was the second time he attempted to combat the effects alcohol was having on his life.
0 4/28
2017
Staff Sgt. Joshua Dunn, 23d Component Maintenance Squadron aerospace propulsion craftsman, poses with his wife, Brentnie, as he holds the Military Hero Award during the American Red Cross of South Georgia Hero Awards, March 27, 2017, in Valdosta, Ga. On Feb. 3, Dunn utilized his Self-Aid & Buddy Care military training to ensure safety at the scene of a car accident scene. by blocking oncoming traffic and assessing the victim’s ailments until paramedics arrived. (Courtesy photo) Flying Tiger honored as 'Military Hero' recipient
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Joshua Dunn, 23d Component Maintenance Squadron aerospace propulsion craftsman, never knew that safely removing passengers from an overturned car would lead to this moment. Not one to pursue personal accolades for what he feels are obligations, Dunn says he believes in doing what’s right even when others may not be watching. However, all eyes were on him during the American Red Cross of South Georgia Hero Awards, March 27, in Valdosta, Ga. In what began as a normal after work commute, one Friday took a slight detour. During this trip, the oddity of seeing cars bypass an overturned vehicle with no one on scene compelled him to approach the vehicle. He instinctively blocked oncoming traffic as his military Self-Aid & Buddy Care training kicked in while he inched closer to the vehicle. Unable to see inside the car because of the deployed airbags, the muffled voiced of children ensured Dunn that there was indeed signs of life, which led him to pry the doors open. Assessing the victims, he removed the passengers to safety until the paramedics arrived. Upon their arrival, Dunn proceeded to help load the victims in the ambulances, unsure of the driver’s fate. Luckily, everyone survived.
0 4/24
2017
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