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Fire fighters demonstrate holiday cooking dangers
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Daniel Gough, 4th Civil Engineer Squadron fire fighter, backs away from a deep fryer after dropping in a frozen turkey during a Turkey Fryer Fire demonstration on Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 16, 2012. Flames engulfed the pot and supporting structure in less than five seconds, representing the outcome of frying an unthawed turkey. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Mariah Tolbert/Released)
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Fire fighters demonstrate holiday cooking dangers

Posted 11/21/2012   Updated 11/21/2012 Email story   Print story

    


by Airman 1st Class Mariah Tolbert
4th Fighter Wing Public Affairs


11/21/2012 - SEYMOUR JOHNSON AIR FORCE BASE, N.C. -- Between planning, shopping and getting care packages together for loved ones overseas, the holidays can be a taxing and chaotic time for Airmen and their families.

The 4th Civil Engineer Squadron fire emergency services flight hosted a Turkey Fryer Fire demonstration at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, N.C., Nov. 16, to inform the public of the hazards associated with deep frying a frozen turkey and what to do in case a fire begins.

Each year many people try to find easier and faster ways to cook their turkeys to make the day a little less stressful. Deep frying a turkey, not only delivers great flavor, but also allows less time spent in the kitchen and more time spent with family and friends.

"The delicious deep-fried turkey has quickly grown in popularity thanks to celebrity chefs such as Martha Stewart and Emeril Lagasse," said Sean Quinby, Chief of 4th CES fire emergency services flight. "Turkey frying is the fastest way to cook a turkey. By deep frying a turkey, you can cook it in as little as three minutes per pound."

On average, roasting a turkey for Thanksgiving takes about 15 minutes per pound, compared to the three minutes per pound it takes to deep fry. Although it seems faster, deep frying may not be the best option.

"There is a danger to cooking with gallons of boiling oil over an open flame," Quinby said. "The use of turkey fryers is considered a serious fire risk and can cause serious injuries."

Accidents resulting from turkey fryers do not always end in a fire, they can also cause severe burns and damaged property from the fryer tipping over.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, deep fryer fires cause on average, five deaths, 60 injuries and more than $15 million in property damage each year.

There are many ways to prevent a fire from breaking out while deep frying a turkey. Tips to keep in mind are:

· Using the fryer outside a safe distance from buildings and other flammable materials

· Make sure the fryers are on a flat and stable surface

· Never leave the fryer unattended

· Use protective gear like potholders and safety goggles to protect body parts from burns

· Make sure the turkey is completely thawed and that the turkey is not drenched in marinades because oil and water do not mix, so when water is placed into the oil, it can cause a spill over causing a fire or even an explosion hazard.



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