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CATM prepares Airmen for safe deployment

Ammunition rests on a table at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range, July 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Ammunition rests on a table at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range, July 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Staff Sgt. Larneal Laymond, 23d Security Forces Squadron combat arms instructor, distributes an M4 carbine, July 25, 2017, at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range at Moody Air Force Base, Ga., July 25, 2017. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Staff Sgt. Larneal Laymond, 23d Security Forces Squadron combat arms instructor, distributes an M4 carbine, July 25, 2017, at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range at Moody Air Force Base, Ga., July 25, 2017. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Senior Airman Ethan Aarness, 41st Rescue Squadron HH-60G Pave Hawk special missions aviator, loads a magazine with ammunition at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range, July 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Senior Airman Ethan Aarness, 41st Rescue Squadron HH-60G Pave Hawk special missions aviator, loads a magazine with ammunition at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range, July 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Airmen prepare to shoot at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range, July 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Airmen prepare to shoot at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range, July 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Senior Airman Donald Sweeney, 41st Rescue Squadron HH-60G Pave Hawk crew chief, looks through his sight as he fires his M4 carbine, July 25, 2017, at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Senior Airman Donald Sweeney, 41st Rescue Squadron HH-60G Pave Hawk crew chief, looks through his sight as he fires his M4 carbine, July 25, 2017, at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Airmen analyze their targets at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range, July 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Airmen analyze their targets at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range, July 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Airmen walk back after placing their targets at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range, July 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

Airmen walk back after placing their targets at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range, July 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. During CATM, Airmen must demonstrate quality safety standards while handling and shooting their weapons in order to qualify to deploy. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt)

MOODY AIR FORCE BASE, Ga. --

Airmen learned to shoot safely to qualify for deployment at the Combat Arms Training and Maintenance range at Moody Air Force Base, Ga., July 25.

Airmen getting ready to deploy have to go through CATM four months prior to deploying.

When it comes to safety, Staff Sgt. Larneal Laymond, 23d Security Forces Squadron combat arms instructor, emphasized its importance as well as the 1:7 ratio the instructors provide for the shooters.

“The biggest thing with weapon safety is making sure they’re keeping their weapon pointed in the right direction,” said Laymond. “You get a lot of people who don’t shoot weapons every day, so it’s very easy to just take it as the extension of your arm, and turn to your left or your right and there’s an individual facing there. They don’t do it on purpose, of course, they’re just trying to talk to the individual next to them or trying to get the instructor’s attention, and they accidently flag the person next to them. So we’re usually standing pretty close to each person. There’s a 1:7 ratio to instructor to shooter, so we’re all standing behind pretty much each shooter, making sure everything is safe at all times.”