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The Ochos keep ‘em moving

A C-17 Globemaster III sits on the flight line while Airmen from the 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight finish their preflight inspection June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The 8 EAMS provides airlift capability to units across the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, Freedom Sentinel and Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

A C-17 Globemaster III sits on the flight line while Airmen from the 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight finish their preflight inspection June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The 8th EAMS provides airlift capability to units across the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, Operation Freedom's Sentinel and Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Taylor, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight instruments and flight controls craftsman, turns on the hydraulics systems during a hydraulic preflight inspection on a C-17 Globemaster III June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. MXA Airmen maintain the most technically advanced cargo airlift aircraft in the world as the largest enroute unit in the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility. They maintain both C-17 Globemaster III and C-5 Galaxy coming in and out of the base as well as commercial aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Taylor, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight (MXA) instruments and flight controls craftsman, turns on the hydraulics systems during a hydraulic preflight inspection on a C-17 Globemaster III June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. MXA Airmen maintain the most technically advanced cargo airlift aircraft in the world as the largest enroute unit in the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility. They maintain both C-17 Globemaster III and C-5 Galaxy coming in and out of the base as well as commercial aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Josh Budinich, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance flight aero repair craftsman, inspects the tires of a C-17 Globemaster III during a preflight inspection June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Budinich takes approximately three hours to inspect the whole aircraft, inside and out, from its tires and brakes to the oil in its engines. Due to the warm weather here, Airmen keep the aircraft at a constant temperature while operating on any of the systems on the aircraft to prevent additional issues from occurring. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Josh Budinich, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance flight aero repair craftsman, inspects the tires of a C-17 Globemaster III during a preflight inspection June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Budinich takes approximately three hours to inspect the whole aircraft, inside and out, from its tires and brakes to the oil in its engines. Due to the warm weather here, Airmen keep the aircraft at a constant temperature while operating on any of the systems on the aircraft to prevent additional issues from occurring. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Taylor, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight instruments and flight controls craftsman, checks the avionics and non-avionics fault list through the heads up display during a hydraulic preflight inspection on a C-17 Globemaster III June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Checking the fault list of a C-17 is one of the first steps when conducting a hydraulic preflight inspection. Members of the maintenance flight maintain six dwell C-17 aircraft assigned to the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility and any transit C-17s, C-5 Galaxies and commercial aircraft that arrive here. On average, Airmen work on six to nine aircraft each day in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, Operation Freedom's Sentinel and Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Taylor, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight instruments and flight controls craftsman, checks the avionics and non-avionics fault list through the heads up display during a hydraulic preflight inspection on a C-17 Globemaster III June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Checking the fault list of a C-17 is one of the first steps when conducting a hydraulic preflight inspection. Members of the maintenance flight maintain six dwell C-17 aircraft assigned to the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility and any transit C-17s, C-5 Galaxies and commercial aircraft that arrive here. On average, Airmen work on six to nine aircraft each day in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, Operation Freedom's Sentinel and Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Taylor, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight instruments and flight controls craftsman, performs a hydraulic preflight inspection on a C-17 Globemaster III June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The MXA flight here receives, refuels and launches C-17s, C-5 Galaxies and Boeing 777, 767 and 747 aircraft. In addition, they also support Maintenance Recovery Teams that deploy downrange to fix and recover any broken C-17s and C-5s aircraft around the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Taylor, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight instruments and flight controls craftsman, performs a hydraulic preflight inspection on a C-17 Globemaster III June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The MXA flight here receives, refuels and launches C-17s, C-5 Galaxies and Boeing 777, 767 and 747 aircraft. In addition, they also support Maintenance Recovery Teams that deploy downrange to fix and recover any broken C-17s and C-5s aircraft around the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Josh Budinich, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight aero repair craftsman, prepares his checklist prior to inspecting a C-17 Globemaster III June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The 8th EAMS contains Aerial Port Flight and Aircraft Maintenance Flight. MXA Airmen maintain the most technically advanced cargo airlift aircraft in the world as the largest enroute unit in the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility. They refuel and launch C-17s, C-5 Galaxies and Boeing 777, 767 and 747 aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Josh Budinich, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight aero repair craftsman, prepares his checklist prior to inspecting a C-17 Globemaster III June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. The 8th EAMS contains Aerial Port Flight and Aircraft Maintenance Flight. MXA Airmen maintain the most technically advanced cargo airlift aircraft in the world as the largest enroute unit in the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility. They refuel and launch C-17s, C-5 Galaxies and Boeing 777, 767 and 747 aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Josh Budinich, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight aero repair craftsman, controls the C-17 Globemaster III cargo ramp and door during a preflight inspection June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Airmen from MXA spend approximately three hours inspecting and ensuring the aircraft is mission ready prior to each flight. The 8 EAMS provides airlift support to units across the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Josh Budinich, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight aero repair craftsman, controls the C-17 Globemaster III cargo ramp and door during a preflight inspection June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Airmen from MXA spend approximately three hours inspecting and ensuring the aircraft is mission ready prior to each flight. The 8th EAMS provides airlift support to units across the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility to include Bagram Airfield and Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Josh Budinich, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight aero repair craftsman, installs the C-17 Globemaster III cargo ramp toes during a preflight inspection June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Depending on the situation of the aircraft, inspections can take nearly three hours to ensure the aircraft is prepared for the next mission.  One of the many challenges Airmen face here is the impact of heat on various systems; with the warm weather, Airmen have to keep the aircraft at a constant temperature while operating on any of the systems to prevent additional issues. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Josh Budinich, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight aero repair craftsman, installs the C-17 Globemaster III cargo ramp toes during a preflight inspection June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Depending on the situation of the aircraft, inspections can take nearly three hours to ensure the aircraft is prepared for the next mission. One of the many challenges Airmen face here is the impact of heat on various systems; with the warm weather, Airmen have to keep the aircraft at a constant temperature while operating on any of the systems to prevent additional issues. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Taylor, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight instruments and flight controls craftsman, stands by as Staff Sgt. Josh Budinich, 8th EAMS, MXA aero repair craftsman, controls the C-17 Globemaster III cargo ramp during a preflight inspection June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Approximately 130 Airmen from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Joint Base Charleston, S.C., and Travis Air Force Base, Calif. work around the clock maintaining the airlift assets here. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Taylor, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight instruments and flight controls craftsman, stands by as Staff Sgt. Josh Budinich, 8th EAMS, MXA aero repair craftsman, controls the C-17 Globemaster III cargo ramp during a preflight inspection June 30, 2016, at Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar. Approximately 130 Airmen from Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash., Joint Base Charleston, S.C., and Travis Air Force Base, Calif. work around the clock maintaining the airlift assets here. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Janelle Patiño/Released)

AL UDEID AIR BASE, Qatar --

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Taylor, 8th Expeditionary Air Mobility Squadron, Aircraft Maintenance Flight instruments and flight controls craftsman, and Staff Sgt. Josh Budinich, 8th EAMS MXA aero repair craftsman, conduct a preflight inspection on a C-17 Globemaster III June 30 here.

 

8th EAMS Airmen maintain the most technically advanced cargo airlift aircraft in the world as the largest enroute unit in the U.S. Air Forces Central Command area of responsibility. They maintain C-17s, C-5 Galaxies and other commercial aircraft coming in and out of the base. Additionally, they also support Maintenance Recovery Teams to fix and recover any broken C-17 or C-5 around the AOR without C-17 and C-5 support.

 

The airlift aircraft are capable of rapid strategic delivery of troops and all types of cargo to main operating bases or directly to forward bases in the deployment area. They can perform tactical airlift and airdrop missions and can transport litters and ambulatory patients during aeromedical evacuations when required.

 

The 8th EAMS recently received the Ground Safety Award of Distinction from U.S. Air Forces Central Command for demonstrating the hands-on fall-rescue plan in the event that someone slips and falls off of the wing of a C-17.