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  • PTSD: Seeking out mental health care is the first step to wellness

    Service members, family members and veterans who suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder may repeatedly re-experience their ordeal as nightmares, flashbacks or frightening thoughts, especially when exposed to events that remind them of their original trauma, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They also may experience overanxious watchfulness or a tendency to withdraw or avoid situations and people that remind them of their traumatic experience, CDC said.
  • PTSD, What You Should Know

    According to the National Center for PTSD-Department of Veterans Affairs, PTSD is a mental health issue that one may develop after witnessing or experiencing a life-threatening event such as a natural disaster, combat, sexual assault, or car accident. They also specify that anyone can develop PTSD and at any time in their life after a traumatic event.
  • The longest day of the year: Musser to row 24 hours

    June is Post traumatic stress disorder awareness month: John Musser started the story in 2009 when he explained how he began to notice his wife having memory issues with minor things she wanted to tell him, and it progressed as months went on. In 2014 after receiving another cognitive test, the doctors noticed a significant decline since 2009. Due to previous head injuries and suffering from post-traumatic stress, they recommended psychology.
  • Mental Health Awareness Month

    Mental Health has been a struggle for my family since before I was even born. When I was a kid my father grappled with undiagnosed Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), which affected everyone in my family, and eventually my own mental health.  It used to be a running joke that, “Taylor has PTSD from her Dad’s PTSD”. While it may not be very funny in retrospect, it helped us get over a lot of those awkward silences that can follow an explosive moment.
  • Rescue dogs help heal wounded warriors

    The Office of the Warrior Advocate is a first-of-its-kind organization that was founded by two wounded warriors that saw a need. It is in that same spirit of seeing needs and answering the call that service dogs are becoming part of Offutt’s landscape and cultural norms. Organically, a small group of veterans was in the right place, with the right skills, the right heart, and passion to create a system that would help their fellow wingmen who were suffering from invisible wounds.
  • Unresolved trauma can lead to PTSD

    It is just another routine day with the same route to work, place to eat and office conversations until it is suddenly interrupted by a sound, smell or familiar face that triggers a flood of overwhelming emotions.
  • A Day That Resonates

    By looking at him you wouldn’t know it, but Tech Sgt. Trevor Brewer, a flight chief with the 72nd Security Forces Squadron at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma, has deep scars from a day seven years ago that took the lives of two fellow Airmen, and severely wounded two others. His wounds are invisible. He has post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from a terrorist attack many may have heard news reports about and forgotten. But, Brewer has not forgotten that day… he relives those moments constantly.
  • A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD

    Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty. One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.
  • A peek behind the curtain: The first step of PTSD care

    Perhaps the most difficult part of seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder is making that first appointment, since Airmen are often unsure of what to expect. Not knowing what to expect from mental health providers can get in the way of effective PTSD treatment.
  • A peak behind the curtain: PTSD barriers and stigmas

    Effective treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder is possible, but many Airmen falsely think seeking medical help for PTSD will hurt their career and will not help them get better. These stigmas and misconceptions create perceived barriers, preventing Airmen from seeking care. Delaying treatment can cause the anxiety and fear following a traumatic event to affect an Airman’s readiness.
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