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  • Safety: A key component in any good holiday celebration

    The Air Forces top three leaders highlighted winter and holiday safety hazards in a recently released tri-signature memorandum.
  • Keeping Cool Over Salt Lake

    The day started like any other Thursday fly day. We briefed, put on our flight gear and stepped to the jets. Startup, taxi, takeoff and departure to the airspace all went as planned. Capt. Jonathan Lowell recounts his story and lessons learned after experiencing an integrated power package failure while flying a F-35A.
  • Back to School Safety

    Back to school season is here, and that means sharing the roads with buses and pedestrians. The Tyndall Air Force Base safety office wants to inform drivers on the importance of safe driving on base and around schools.
  • Rain or shine, weather flight protects flightline

    The 20th Operations Support Squadron weather flight Airmen’s discipline, attention to detail and continued emphasis on the hard-earned basics are what stand between unseen deadly flying conditions and the pilots of Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina.
  • Fireworks safety: don’t get burned on the Fourth of July

    According to the National Fire Protection Association, or NFPA, fireworks produce an average of almost 18,500 reported fires per year. Sparklers are credited for more than one-quarter of emergency room injuries. This Fourth of July, people across America will be celebrating the nation’s birthday. Backyard picnics, family gatherings, food, drink and of course mom’s apple pie will be a treat. Fireworks will lighting up the sky around cities and towns.
  • Preventing heat illness

    Heat is one of the leading weather-related killers. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that an average of 658 deaths are directly attributable to heat each year in the United States. Exposure to excessive heat can exacerbate many pre-existing health conditions, (e.g., cardiovascular, cerebral, and respiratory diseases), contributing to deaths from heart attacks, strokes, or respiratory ailments.
  • Mountain Home AFB: First to use Portable Doppler Radar for CONUS Ops

    Weather can be an unrelenting force and infamously fickle. Severe weather can adversely affect the safety of aircrew and Airmen working in the elements. Fortunately, advanced radars with weather forecasting capabilities can mitigate the associated risks. Keeping constant surveillance on weather patterns and their potential hazards is an important step in enhancing readiness and safety of Airmen. Until recently, this often proved to be a challenge when local radars needed to undergo routine maintenance or upgrades. Mountain Home Air Force Base is the first to show how Portable Doppler Radars (PDRs) can be used to support continental United States (CONUS) operations to fix this problem.
  • Summer – A time to enjoy family, friends, and practice good risk management

    While June 21 is the official beginning of summer, Memorial Day weekend acts as the unofficial kickoff to the summer season for many Air Force families. The weather is in that sweet spot between not too hot, and not too cold. Many families are enjoying an extended weekend together. Friends gather to barbeque and take time to honor those who died while serving the United States. Simply put, it is a great jump-start for the season to come.
  • Airman enhances aircrew readiness in worst-case scenarios

    F-15E Strike Eagles are a feared weapon, capable speeding past mach 2.5, day or night, in any weather, armed with a versatile arsenal of weaponry. The aircrew of an F-15E will likely win any fight put in their way. But in the tragic event that they must eject, Airman First Class Zack Day ensures the aircrew are ready to fight and survive their way home.
  • Safety Culture and Readiness

    "Sir," he said, "we have four jets available." My first reaction was total disbelief mixed with frustration. At the time, we had 24 jets in the squadron and my Pro Super had just informed me that only four out of 24 were mission ready. The remaining 20 jets were non-mission capable. How was this even possible?! I honestly had to ask him to repeat what he had just said. Again, utterly defeated, he calmly and quietly repeated, "Sir, we have four jets."
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