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  • 'Ghost-painted' F-16 takes to the sky

    An F-16 Fighting Falcon with a "ghost" paint scheme departs Hill Air Force Base, Utah, for Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., June 3, 2020. The 576th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron painted the jet at the request of the 64th Aggressor Squadron at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, that participates in training with Air Force and other aviation branches during Red Flag exercises. The paint scheme is intended to replicate an adversary’s fighter jet. United States, allied, and partner-nation aircrews routinely train against accurate and realistic threats including aircraft painted to replicate those pilots might see in aerial combat.
  • Red Flag 20-2: Maximizing combat readiness, capability, survivability between forces

    Deployed maintainers from all over the world flood the flight line turning wrenches to ensure their assigned aircraft are ready to take over the skies, this controlled chaos signifies Red Flag is back in session March 6-20, here.
  • Sky is the limit for Red Flag 20-2

    An F/A-18C Super Hornet multi-role combat jet assigned to Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 232 at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California, flies at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, March 9, 2020. Red Flag increases interoperability between partner nations and across the joint force as Airmen train together against high-end, realistic scenarios.
  • 388th, 419th Fighter Wings serve as core wing at Red Flag

    Airmen from the 388th Fighter Wing, alongside reservists from the 419th Fighter Wing, are currently deployed for combat training with the F-35A Lightning II here during Red Flag where they are performing the “core wing” function at what is known as the Air Force’s premier large force exercise.
  • Unique F-35A program, maintainers progress during Red Flag 20-1

    Hundreds of Airmen from Hill’s 388th and 419th Fighter Wing are deployed here with the 421st Fighter Squadron for Red Flag, the Air Force’s premier large force combat exercise. This is the first Red Flag for the 421st Fighter Squadron as an F-35A Lightning II unit.
  • 805th Combat Training Squadron; Nellis AFB’s newest squadron

    The operations center sits in a large room, filled with rows of computers, displaying a simulated combat scenario. Above different areas in the room are signs designating who sits where. Cyber, Space and Judge Advocate are just a few of the stations in the dark room. Illuminating the area in the front are projector screens displaying real aircraft positioning, weather maps and other intel sources. Announcements over the intercom can be heard of major developments such as a fallen aircraft or incoming opposition.
  • Dedicated to the Raptor

    The 106 degree Fahrenheit heat beats down on the Nellis Air Force Base flightline where crew chiefs work tirelessly to complete the mission of Red Flag 19-3. Out of the more than 20 units from across the U.S. Armed Forces and Australian Air Force that attended the exercise, the crew chiefs from the 94th Aircraft Maintenance Unit worked to ensure that eight of the 1st Fighter Wing’s F-22 Raptors were prepared to complete their mission.
  • Giving F-22 Raptor its senses

    The F-22 Raptor is one of the U.S. Air Force’s fifth generation fighter aircraft, performing both air-to-air and air-to-ground missions allowing full realization of operational concepts vital to the 21st century fight. With the combination of sensor capability, integrated avionics, and advanced situational awareness technology, the F-22 Raptor airframe allows the pilot to track, identify, shoot and neutralize threats before being detected.
  • 726th ACS updates Control and Reporting Center

    The 726th Air Control Squadron, a geographically separated unit of the 552nd Air Control Wing, impressed at recent training exercise, Red Flag 19-2. Better known by their call sign, Hardrock, the unit became the first to fully integrate the new generation of Control and Reporting Center into their training, the TYQ-23A.
  • Colombian Air Force supports US Navy Growlers for premier air-to-air combat

    The Colombian Air Force is supporting the U.S. Navy during the U.S. Air Force-led air-to-air combat exercise Red Flag. The Colombian Air Force brought their Multi-Mission Transport Tanker Jupiter 767 to refuel the U.S. Navy’s EA-18G Growlers for the duration of the exercise. The Colombian MMTT Jupiter 767 is the only aircraft capable to conduct air-to-air refueling missions for the Growler during Red Flag 19-2 due to different air-to-air refueling systems available for the exercise.
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