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  • Wolf Pack conducts wing verification

    Nine F-16 pilots and two intelligence officers rounded out a week’s worth of academics, studying, mission planning and simulations by presenting their knowledge and planned mission to members of the Wolf Pack June 30, 2017, at Kunsan Air Base to earn their respective verification status.
  • 54th Fighter Group pilot named Fighter Instructor Pilot of the Year

    One of Holloman’s Airmen, Maj. John R. Widmer, 314th Fighter Squadron flight commander and an F-16 instructor pilot, was named the Air Force’s Fighter Instructor Pilot of the Year. The award is designed to recognize fighter pilots and weapon systems officers’ commitment, performance, leadership and aviation skills that were instrumental to mission success of their units, the U.S. Air Force and the Defense Department.
  • USAF Weapons School F-16 hits 35 years old

    The United States Air Force Weapons School F-16 Fighting Falcon division hosted a reunion for past and present members to celebrate its 35th Anniversary June 15, at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada.
  • CrossTell air defense exercise hones air-intercept skills

    Aircrews and associated support personnel from across the military air-defense enterprise are here today for a three-day Aerospace Control Alert CrossTell live-fly training exercise. Representatives from Air National Guard fighter wings, Civil Air Patrol and U.S. Coast Guard rotary-wing air intercept units will conduct daily live-fly sorties from today through May 25 to hone their skills with tactical-level air intercept procedures.
  • NATO partners conduct close air support exercise

    Today’s fight against terrorism doesn’t rest on the shoulders of one country. It’s a team fight, meaning countries must be interoperable to effectively defeat the evil in this world. To better support that team, members of the German air force’s Air Ground Operations Squadron partnered with the 19th Air Support Operations Squadron to conduct a close air support exercise, April 10 to 14 at Camp Grayling, Mich.
  • Combat Shield inspection certifies Saber readiness

    The 480th Aircraft Maintenance Unit’s Avionics Shop here underwent a Combat Shield evaluation March 20–24. A Combat Shield evaluation team from the 16th Electronic Warfare Squadron at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, conducted the annual inspection to gauge the effectiveness of the threat-detection systems and countermeasures aboard the F-16 Fighting Falcons assigned here.
  • Hill F-16 squadrons celebrating 40 years of combat airpower, part 2

    In honor of the F-16, whose operational service here is coming to a close this year, we continue our two-week tribute to the men and women of the 388th Fighter Wing and Team Hill who have supported Viper’s combat mission for the past 38 years.
  • Hill F-16 squadron celebrating 40 years of combat airpower, part 1

    Forty years ago, the United States Air Force announced that the 388th Fighter Wing would be the first unit to transition to the F-16 Fighting Falcon, now more commonly known as the Viper. Thirty-eight years ago, the first operational F-16A took to the skies here and the Viper has been slipping the surly bonds of earth over Utah ever since.
  • F-16CM THUNDERBIRD ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED

    A throttle trigger malfunction and inadvertent throttle rotation resulted in an F-16CM being destroyed upon impacting the ground south of Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, June 2, 2016, according to an Accident Investigation Board report released today. The Thunderbird pilot ejected and sustained a minor injury.
  • Point of Recovery: Ground Collision Avoidance System saving pilots lives

    Frantic calls of “Two recover, Two recover, Two recover,” echoed across the airwaves. Maj. Luke O’Sullivan, F-16 Fighting Falcon instructor pilot, watched helplessly from his cockpit as his student’s jet descended from an altitude of over 3 miles to under 4,400 feet in a matter of seconds. While executing a more than 8-G turn, the over 1,000 pounds of pressure had drained the blood from the student’s brain, causing tunnel vision and impairing his ability to rationalize. Within seconds, he was a victim of gravity-induced loss of consciousness. Given the rapid rate of descent, O’Sullivan knew there was no way the pilot could regain consciousness in time to pull out of the free fall. In less than four seconds, his student would be dead — except, he didn’t die. Instead, the essentially pilotless F-16 rolled upright, pulled a 5-G climb and then leveled off. The pilot’s savior: a technology developed in the 1980s known as the Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System.
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