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  • Helping F-35A pilots operate, survive at Red Flag

    The F-35 is lethal and survivable in almost any environment, but it’s just a machine, unable to do anything without a skilled pilot. Those pilots need gear to interface with the jet, operate and survive. Outfitting the pilots is the job of the Airmen in the 388th Operations Support Squadron Aircrew Flight Equipment shop. A handful are currently deployed to Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, for Red Flag 19-1. Red Flag is the Air Force’s premier combat training exercise where units from across the Air Force join with allied nations in a “blue force” to combat a “red force” in a variety of challenging scenarios over three weeks.
  • Red Flag adjusts for today’s challenges

    The 414th Combat Training Squadron (CTS), which oversees Red Flag, is making changes to the exercise for improved efficiency at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev. Red Flag is a realistic multi-domain training exercise that maximizes the combat readiness and survivability of participants by providing a robust, accurate training environment. While early Red Flag exercises focused on survivability of combat pilots, Red Flag integrates the five core functions of the Air Force: Intelligence Reconnaissance Surveillance (ISR), Command and Control, Air Superiority, Strike and Personnel Recovery to ensure Airmen are ready for today’s fight.
  • Finding a purpose

    Everyone goes through hard times throughout their life. Whether it be the death of a loved one, financial issues or an internal struggle, there are ways to get through troubling times.
  • Creech Showcases RPA enterprise to AFCENT leadership

    Lt. Gen. Joseph Guastella, U.S. Air Forces Central Command commander, and Chief Master Sgt. Shawn Drinkard, AFCENT command chief, visited Creech Air Force Base, Nevada, Jan. 16, 2019. Guastella and Drinkard visited different operational flying squadrons on base and the Persistent Attack and Reconnaissance Operations Center to get a hands-on look at how combat Remotely Piloted Aircraft missions are executed while also interacting with the Airmen who support them. Drinkard experienced what it’s like to fly a MQ-9 Reaper in a simulated environment, learning from experienced Airmen how they execute missions.
  • We are just like you

    Rigid structure, aircraft and guns. These are some examples of what many people may think of when they hear about the military. Many forget that outside the uniform, military members are regular people, too. Just like everyone else, they have fears, hobbies and family.
  • Uniform code of military justice changes

    Effective Jan. 1, 2019, the Military Justice Act of 2016 will instate the most reform to the Uniform Code of Military Justice and Manual for Courts-Martial in decades, modernizing dated aspects of the military justice system while also providing transparency.
  • FLOTUS visits JBLE

    First Lady Melania Trump visited with a U.S. Air Force Airman at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, Dec. 12, 2018. Trump recognized and thanked family members for their support of U.S. service members. While at the base the 1st Fighter Wing commander, U.S. Air Force Col. Jason Hinds, gave the first lady a tour of the F-22 Raptor Hinds briefed Trump on the F-22’s capabilities through its combination of stealth, supercruise, maneuverability, and integrated avionics. After Trump’s visit to JBLE, she flew to the USS George H.W. Bush to meet U.S. Navy Sailors.
  • EOD 134 Memorial Workout

    Airmen assigned to the 380th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal flight hosted the EOD 134 Memorial Workout, Nov. 30.
  • One step at a time

    Senior Master Sgt. David Snyder put on his physical training uniform and fought the tension inside his chest. It was the day of his annual PT test. Like all his tests before, he had been preparing for months. But this time, he was a lot more nervous. He drove himself to the site. He did as many push-ups and sit-ups as he could in 60 seconds, he ran a mile and a half, and he got his waist measured. In the end, he easily passed the test with a score of 84.4 – with a prosthetic where one of his legs used to be. Five months prior, Snyder lost his left leg in a brutal motorcycle accident.
  • Policy changes for Post-9/11 GI Bill transfers

    Additional changes to the Post-9/11 GI Bill Transfer of Benefits policy were announced Nov. 14, 2018. The Department of Defense postponed their previous effective date of July 12, 2018, to July 12, 2019. Since the policy change was effective immediately, service members who were previously eligible found themselves ineligible to transfer their benefits. To ensure issues were addressed fairly, the effective date was pushed back a year.
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