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  • Eyes and Ears: Command Center provides vital information for combat missions, support

    Strategic aerial support and combat missions occur daily around the world; and Airmen at the Air Combat Command, Command Center work 24-7 to ensure that their major command’s commander and his staff are well informed of the statuses of their MAJCOM missions. While a command center is similar to a command post, the ACC Command Center works on a much larger scale gathering internal and external information that affects all of the command’s bases, not just a single installation. The center then gives all that data to the COMACC enabling him to make informed decisions and lead his command with the proper information.
  • Warfighters return to loved ones

    During the seven-month deployment the 74th Fighter Squadron flew more than 1,700 sorties, employed weapons over 4,400 times, destroyed 2,300 targets and killed 2,800 insurgents.
  • Airman’s road to becoming an officer

    Working as an emergency medical technician in New York City where a yearly call volume is around 5,000 is a grueling job especially when responding to crime scenes of stabbings or shootings. For Senior Airman Angelo DePrimo, 366th Contracting Squadron contract specialist, this was his life — on top of going to school and working a second job. While working his second job life guarding, he met an Air Force pararescuemen who sparked his interest in joining the military. “Besides the actual call volume, and what I was dealing with every day on the ambulance I wasn’t finding anything else challenging,” he said.
  • POL enables faster turnarounds, longer missions

    “With hot-pit refuels we’re prepositioned and they taxi to us and with the engines still running,” said Tech. Sgt. Zachary Beggin, 23d LRS NCO in charge of fuels distribution. “They hookup, refuel and their back up in the air and it decreases ground time by 66 percent.” Less ground time means more time in the air and in the mission. This tactic equips aircrews with the ability to push the operations tempo and also minimize the demand for maintenance support.
  • Team Moody brings holiday spirit to DFAC

    Leadership from Moody Air Force Base came to the Georgia Pines Dining Facility to serve the annual Christmas meal, Dec. 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The meal was an opportunity for Airmen, retirees, dependents and leadership to enjoy a traditional Christmas meal.
  • Metals tech: perfection in precision

    Precision is the name of the game for the metals technicians, who must abide by the welding and machinery measuring tolerance of three thousandths of an inch, which is approximately the width of a human hair. The 23d Maintenance Squadron’s (MXS) aircraft metals technology technicians strive for perfection when fabricating and repairing Team Moody’s aircraft and equipment to ensure they maintain their continual high ops tempo.
  • Moody Airmen earn national community volunteer award

    Three Moody Airmen were recognized during the 2017 National Public Benefit Flying Awards, Nov. 29, in Arlington, Va. Taking home the Distinguished Volunteer award, these Airmen hosted the largest Legacy Flight Academy’s “Eyes Above the Horizon” youth aviation diversity outreach event in honor of the Tuskegee Airmen. This past summer, they gave approximately 100 South Georgian youth a chance to fly and explore aviation and Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics career opportunities.
  • F-22 Raptor Demo Team receive COMACC qualification

    U.S. Air Force Maj. Paul “Loco” Lopez, U.S. Air Force F-22 Raptor Demonstration Team pilot, completed a qualification performance for U.S. Air Force Gen. Mike Holmes, Commander of Air Combat Command, to certify his capabilities as a demo team pilot at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., Dec. 18, 2017.
  • DFAC services: Bringing the heat, feeding the force

    When it comes to winning a war, victory can fall on which “army’s” troops are fed. To feed an Air Force, the Dining Facility Airmen bring the heat to their battleground: the kitchen. Through teamwork, adaption and striving for excellence, the Georgia Pines DFAC Airmen are able to ensure Team Moody is fed and ready to finish the fight.
  • Hot-pit refueling enables high-ops training

    The 23d Logistics Readiness Squadron’s Petroleum, Oil, Lubricant section kept aircraft flying around the clock by conducting the more efficient hot-pit styled refuels, Dec. 4 -7, during the 23d Wing’s Phase 1, Phase 2 exercise, here. “Hot pits are almost like a gas station attendant,” said Master Sgt. James Holloway, 23d LRS fuel’s superintendent. “With a max surge like this, if we cold serviced, it would take a lot longer.
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