HomeNews

News Search

Results:
Tag: Davis-Monthan
Clear
  • GTOC initiates no contact rental service

    In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, U.S. Air Force bases are adapting new protocol to ensure the safety of their most valuable assets: the Airmen, civilians and their families that are assigned to the installations. The Ground Transportation Operations Center of the 355th Logistics Readiness Squadron leads the way in taking measures to help mitigate the spread of the virus with their innovative efforts of creating a contact-less method to acquire their vehicles.
  • A coin for everyone

    Resiliency plays a huge role in Airmen’s ability to succeed in their Air Force careers. Without the assistance of numerous helping agencies across the base, Airmen would not be equipped with the tools they need to cope during difficult times.
  • Locked and Loaded

    The Airmen of the 355th Wing are committed to readiness and maintaining the ability to deploy at a moment's notice. The individual Protective Equipment Element, assigned to the 355th Logistics Readiness Squadron's material management flight, keeps them ready. The IPEE has a significant impact on the wing’s ability to stay geared up and lethal.
  • Forecasting the future of weather

    Operational Weather Squadrons and weather flights from various Major Commands throughout the Air Force are realigning terminal aerodrome forecast responsibilities. This realignment is scheduled to be completed by October 1, 2020. Davis-Monthan Air Force Base’s 355th Operational Support Squadron Airfield Weather Operations flight officially took over TAF reports from the 25th Operational Weather Squadron after completing a four-week shadowing period, September 1, 2019.
  • 563d RQG Airmen rescue injured Mexican sailors

    Airmen from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base’s 563d Rescue Group traveled more than 1700 miles, to save two critically injured Mexican fishermen onboard the Mazatun fishing vessel, July 10, 2019. The fishermen were injured when their vessel’s crane collapsed more than 1300 miles southwest of San Diego in international waters at approximately 8 p.m., July 9. Fishing nets obstructed Mazatun’s propellers during the incident making the boat unable to transit under its own power. The two severely injured fishermen were transferred to Mazatun’s sister ship, Tamara, who began making the three day journey to the nearest land, a Mexican naval outpost on Socorro Island located more than approximately 840 miles away.
  • Joint Efforts Reach New Heights

    The 355th Wing is made up of diverse and dynamic teams whose mindsets are focused on mission success and maintaining high-end readiness through continuous training and exercises. On June 6, 2019, the 79th Rescue Squadron provided air support to a Combat Search and Rescue training mission. Home to the 563d and 943d Rescue Group, Davis-Monthan is capable of performing CSAR missions in austere and contested locations around the world. Rescue squadrons assigned to these groups often work together to execute CSAR missions downrange.
  • PJs sharpen skills during Razor’s Edge

    The 48th Rescue Squadron from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base participated in an exercise from April 8-18, 2019. Razor’s Edge is a two-week long exercise where pararescuemen train to be better prepared for unilateral and joint combat search and rescue operations in any situation and environment. To meet these expectations they endure rigorous training reflective of real-world scenarios that they may encounter downrange.
  • DM Airmen assist in highway rescue

    High winds and dust whipped the uniforms of two Airmen as they attempted to rescue a woman trapped in the cab of her semitractor-trailer. One of them applied his might to the piece of metal that kept the woman confined to her vehicle and the other held the door of the vehicle while trying to guide her down the steps of its cab toward safety. The next instant, just as the woman was reaching the threshold, something came crashing into the rear end of her vehicle at high speed. The two Airmen were thrown ten feet from the vehicle by the impact and as soon as they finished a quick buddy check, they raced back to continue helping the woman in distress.
  • Airman participates in EOD immersion

    Leaving a career field can be a scary proposition for an Airman who has been performing and learning the ins and outs of their job for the better part of a decade. The new career they choose may or may not be a good fit. Despite that, Staff Sgt. Michael McNally, 355th Maintenance Group scheduler, recently became eligible to retrain into another career field, so he decided to change direction.
  • Mastering the jump

    In order to run a combat free fall jump and deploy Airmen safely from an aircraft at high altitudes, there has to be someone specially trained to direct the operation. They must be highly proficient in every component of the jump process, from ensuring equipment is donned properly, to coordinating with the aircrew during the release so jumpers land on the designated drop zone. In the past, the only place to receive the formal training required to lead a jump was the Military Freefall School at the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona.
RSS