HomeNews

News Search

Results:
Tag: A-10C Thunderbolt II
Clear
  • MXG Airmen ensure clean, serviceable 'Hawgs'

    The A-10C Thunderbolt II has been flying Close Air Support missions for more than 40 years and Moody Air Force Base has the Air Force’s largest operational A-10 Fighter Group. Having fully serviced and functional aircraft at all times is critical to overall mission readiness. To guarantee Moody’s fleet of 49 A-10s are in peak warfighting condition, Airmen from the 23d Maintenance Group dedicate over 10 hours washing each A-10 to ensure the aircraft is free of any surface or structural deficiencies that could present a safety hazard during flight.
  • Moody A-10 engine maintainers make history

    For the first time, Moody’s 23d Maintenance Squadron’s (MXS) propulsion flight accomplished an unprecedented feat by ensuring every TF34 engine in their fleet is repaired to serviceable status. This readiness level relinquishes the need for the flight to perform maintenance on their current A-10C Thunderbolt II engine assets. While they normally maintain the 74th and 75th Aircraft Maintenance Unit’s engines in support of Moody’s close-air support mission, the backshop will now centralize their TF34 repair efforts to assist other bases and Major Commands to include Reserve and National Guard units. This has allowed the 23d MXS to play a vital role in helping secure an Air Force-wide 200 percent ‘war-ready’ engine status, the highest in the TF34’s 40-year history.
  • Munitions flight performs 30mm processing, keeps A-10s shooting

    Airmen from the 476th and 23d Maintenance Squadron (MXS) performed a 30mm rounds processing, July 11, 2018, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. This total force integration training with the 23d and 476th MXS allowed Airmen to work together to identify more ways to efficiently and safely conduct their mission. The munitions flight ensures A-10C Thunderbolt IIs are armed with 30mm rounds to make sure they are able to continue their mission while at home station and deployed.
  • Propulsion flight: keeps 'Warthogs' fighting

    The A-10C Thunderbolt II has been flying the Air Force’s mission for over 40 years; a feat that would not be possible without the efforts of Moody’s propulsion flight. The 23d Maintenance Squadron (MXS) aerospace propulsion flight is responsible for maintaining all Turbo Fan-34 engines for the Air Force’s largest operational A-10 fighter group.
  • 74th FS pilots receive DFC

    Two Airmen received the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) May 23 in recognition of their actions in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. Maj. Matthew “Chowder” Cichowski and Capt. William “Archer” Dana both, 74th Fighter Squadron A-10C Thunderbolt II pilots, risked life and limb while deployed to Incirlik Air Base, Turkey, to protect Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) from a common enemy.
  • Heritage Flight: making a connection

    DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz., -- The U.S. Air Force Heritage Flight Training and Certification Course demonstrates the evolution of the USAF's airpower by flying today’s fighter aircraft in formation with World War II, Korean and Vietnam War - era aircraft. The training includes a performance of formations by current USAF fighters such as F-16 Fighting Falcon, F-35 Lightning II, F-22 Raptor and A-10 Thunderbolt II along with historical warbirds like the P-51 Mustang, P-38 Lightning, P-40 Warhawk and F-86 Sabre.
  • Warfighters return to loved ones

    During the seven-month deployment the 74th Fighter Squadron flew more than 1,700 sorties, employed weapons over 4,400 times, destroyed 2,300 targets and killed 2,800 insurgents.
  • Pilot exemplifies Total Force Integration

    As part of a Total Force Integration initiative, an Air Force Reserve Citizen Airman attended attended the Weapons Instructor Course (WIC) to deploy with his former active-duty squadron. Captivated by the close-air support and combat-search and rescue missions of the A-10C Thunderbolt II, U.S. Air Force Reserve Maj. Matt Paetzhold, 76th Fighter Squadron A-10C Thunderbolt II instructor pilot, joined the ranks of those responsible for effectively integrating multiple weapons systems across the land, air, space and cyber domains.
  • Re-designated 23d Maintenance Squadron continues legacy

    Approximately 800 Airmen from the 23d Component and Equipment Maintenance Squadrons merged to become the 23d Maintenance Squadron, Air Combat Command’s second largest maintenance squadron, during a re-designation ceremony, Nov. 9, here. As these Airmen stood in formation behind unfurled guidons, bearing new names, they now abide by a new motto – ‘MXS!... The Biggest!... The Best!’
  • A 23d Wing ‘hawg’ gets a bath

    What has roughly 40 teeth, sounds like ‘brrrt,’ and occasionally needs a bath? The 23d Wing’s A-10C Thunderbolt IIs, also known as ‘Hawgs,’ are subject to an assortment of scheduled maintenance appointments to include washes every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours. “It’s extremely important that maintenance keeps the aircraft clean,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Thomas Harney, 75th Fighter Squadron director of operations and A-10 pilot. “Every time we fire the gun, gases flow up and cover the aircraft with grease which can affect operational components of the aircraft and the pilot’s visibility.”
RSS