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  • Florida resilience chief gets look at Tyndall rebuild

    Florida’s first Chief Resilience Officer Dr. Julia Nesheiwat visited Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, to see first-hand the Tyndall Program Management Office’s plans to develop and rebuild a resilient “Installation of the Future.” The main responsibility of the CRO is to prepare Florida for the environmental, physical and economic impacts of sea level rise and develop resilience goals that will help protect coastal communities. The Tyndall leadership team briefed Nesheiwat on the current state of the installation and the commitment to incorporate resiliency, innovation and technology as main components of the rebuild plans.
  • Friday Night Wright: CMSAF bonds with Airmen through gaming

    Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force Kaleth O. Wright engaged with Airmen from Air Combat Command during an “ACCPlays” event focused on Airmen resiliency Oct. 25 at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland.
  • Just be there

    Ask. Care. Escort. These are the instructions military members are given when they suspect someone has suicidal ideations. The military stresses the importance of the wingman concept and being there for each other. I did not realize how pertinent those concepts would be in my life when I initially heard them at my first duty station.
  • ‘Don’t worry, be happy’

    There are a variety of occasions in life which can bring to mind the sense we may be a part of something larger and really lead us to take a long hard look at our values, giving us the chance to step back and look at our lives from a different perspective.
  • Mental health providers, leadership partner for deployment resiliency, readiness

    Deployed mental health providers work closely with leadership to help maintain warfighter resiliency and readiness. Service members are away from their usual support systems during deployment, and because the environment and stress puts them in unusual situations, they require innovative and flexible forms of mental health care.
  • COMMENTARY: Our Cardboard Christmas Tree

    Holidays are tough for me. I used to love Thanksgiving and Christmas, but some difficult times fell upon my family and I found myself separated from the joy I once knew. Maybe you find this season difficult as well, or maybe you are a sucker for Hallmark-esque Christmas tearjerkers like me my wife. Either way, I’d like to share a little story about how my hardened heart found some healing after great tragedy.
  • Deploying mental health care downrange

    Deployed mental health providers play a vital role in delivering medical care downrange, ensuring the health of the warfighter and the mission. Even though service members who deploy are medically ready, both physically and mentally, the rigors of deployment can take a toll.
  • Tyndall F-22 family proves resilient after Hurricane Michael, father’s plane crash

    Ten days after Hurricane Michael ravaged Maj. Jeremy Boudreaux’s home and Tyndall AFB, he got a call that his father was killed in a plane crash approximately 30 miles northwest of Eglin AFB. Boudreaux and his wife, Jessie, had evacuated to Auburn, Ala. but when they got the call that his father passed away they drove to the crash site.
  • Faces of Recovery: Resilience through tragedy

    As the majority of Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, was devastated by the severe damage caused by Hurricane Michael, thousands of Airmen, families and civilian workers were forced to evacuate the base. One evacuee shared her story of how she maintained resilience throughout the ordeal.
  • Finding healing through helping others

    Seeking care never slowed me down; it helped me through my toughest times.” Senior Master Sgt. Richard “Joe” Chwalik has been through a lifetime’s worth of setbacks; incidents that have left long-lasting emotional scars. Yet, he found his way through the darkness by asking for help when he needed it most. Like many, Chwalik witnessed a lot during his deployment to Kabul, Afghanistan in 2009. However, an incident in October of that year left a lasting impact on him. Chwalik did not return to seek help due to fears of facing the medical evaluation board process. He numbed his pain with sleeping pills most weeks, and with alcohol over the weekends. His symptoms included flashbacks, bouts of anger and frustration, night sweats and terror leading to many sleepless nights. He constantly relived what he experienced while deployed to Afghanistan.
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