HomeNews

News Search

Results:
Tag: Reaper
Clear
  • Premier MQ-1, MQ-9 Wing changes hands

    The men and women of the leading MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper wing welcomed their new commander during the 432nd Wing change of command ceremony July 6, 2017, at Creech AFB. Col. Julian Cheater assumed command from Col. Case Cunningham in front of a crowd of Airmen, peers and family members while Lt. Gen. Mark Kelly, 12th Air Force commander, presided over the day’s ceremony. During the event, Kelly congratulated the wing on its accomplishments.
  • MQ-9 maintainer’s innovation expedites engine training

    In order to enable airpower, the Air Force calls upon skilled and competent maintainers to perform all required functions to keep aircraft at the ready. This means maintainers must be properly trained to keep the mission going, so when Master Sgt. Eric, 432nd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Reaper Aircraft Maintenance Unit production superintendent, had the opportunity to solve a problem within the MQ-9 Reaper community, he seized it.
  • New Block 5 MQ-9 debuts in combat

    On 23 June, 2017, the latest version of the MQ-9 Reaper, the Block 5 variant, was successfully flown in combat in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. The aircrew flew a sortie of over 16 hours with a full payload of weapons including GBU-38 Joint Direct Attack Munitions and AGM-114 Hellfire missiles. During the mission, the crew employed one GBU-38 and two Hellfires while providing hours of armed reconnaissance for supported ground forces.
  • Frankenphone 2.0: MQ-9 communication innovation

    In 2015, a former member of the 42nd Attack Squadron saw a need to improve communications from MQ-9 Reaper aircrew to ground forces, thus, Frankenphone was created. He pieced-together the invention with scrap phone parts and headsets which aimed to improve communications clarity until a long term solution was procured. While the device underwent many iterations of upgrades, it still needed additional work.
  • First MQ-9 Squadron looks good for 100

    From training to operational -- bombers to remotely piloted aircraft, the Panthers of the 42nd Attack Squadron have been a key part of United States airpower for the past 100 years. On June 13, the squadron celebrates its Centennial anniversary with a lineage as the 42nd Aero Squadron, part of the U.S. Signal Corps. Back then, the unit trained aviators during World War I and continued until the mid-1930’s when it was re-designated as the 42nd Bombardment Squadron and placed under the operational control of Reserve personnel.
  • Cleared hot: When predators and reapers engage

    Following the mission brief and pre-flight checks, an aircrew consisting of an officer pilot in command and a career enlisted aviator sensor operator observe a target in an area of responsibility overseas from a cockpit in the United States and waits for the green light from a joint terminal attack controller on the ground. Anticipation heightens as the JTAC confirms the target and gives the aircrew the clearance to attack. The aircrew then reviews checklists before engaging, adrenaline begins to seep in and the whirring from electronic components in the cockpit recedes from awareness. Their concentration sharpens and as the pilot squeezes the trigger, and a laser guided AGM-114 Hellfire missile is released. The sensor operator hones in on the objective at hand by keeping the laser designator crosshairs precisely over the target and guiding the missile. The countdown begins until impact...10, 9, 8…
  • Total Force wingmen enable MQ-1, MQ-9 mission

    In the MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper community, active duty, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve Airmen incorporate as a total force integration to provide 60 combat lines or 60 aircraft in the air, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year. This team of aircrew, maintenance and other career fields ensure mission success by enabling persistent strike and reconnaissance capabilities to eliminate enemies and keep ground and coalition forces safe.
  • All in a night’s work: MQ-9s maximize airpower downrange

    As many Americans sleep soundly in their beds, Airmen in attack squadrons across the 432nd Wing flying the MQ-1 Predator and MQ-9 Reaper from cockpits in the continental U.S. are having decisive effects in the fight against violent extremism. In combat operations, last week, one MQ-9 squadron, in particular, stood above the rest when aircrews employed 13 Hellfire missiles and 500-pound bombs during one eight-hour overnight shift. These employments occurred in two different combat arenas separated by thousands of miles, while the aircrew piloting the aircraft sat, just feet away from one another, in separate cockpits in the squadron.
  • NEWS RELEASE: MQ-9A ABBREVIATED ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED

    Release No: 05112017-1 Date: May 11, 2017 A pilot’s misprioritization of checklist tasks and failure to observe aircraft warnings led to the crash of an MQ-9A Reaper remotely-piloted aircraft on the Nevada Test and Training Range June 7, 2016, according to an Air Combat Command Abbreviated Accident Investigation Board report released today.
  • MQ-9 Reapers add to arsenal with first GBU-38 drop

    Airmen from the 432nd Wing/432nd Air Expeditionary Wing and the 26th Weapons Squadron, Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., made history earlier this week, by employing the first GBU-38 Joint Direct Attack Munition from an MQ-9 Reaper for training.
RSS