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Anne Rissman served as a nurse at the 2nd Evacuation Hospital during World War II. The photo on the left is of Anne taken Aug. 15, 2016 in Boise, Idaho. The photo on the right is when she was serving in the U.S. Army in the early 1940s. (Left, U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jeremy L. Mosier/Released) A tale from the “Greatest Generation”
Many people remember what they were doing or at least remember where they were when they heard the news of historic events: the attacks of 9/11, finding Osama Bin Laden, the Oklahoma City Bombing and the Boston Bombing. However, another memory is slowly fading along with the generation that reacted to it, a memory that galvanized a country to make the ultimate stand against an ultimate evil. A 366th Fighter Wing Public Affairs heritage feature on Anne Rissman, a WW2 veteran who was a nurse in the European campaign and was attached to the 2nd Evacuation Hospital.
0 9/18
2016
Retired U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Bill Gornik served in three wars and inspired thousands of students and airmen with his words. His philosophy can be summed up in two words: "don't quit." (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jeremy L. Mosier) Doing your best no matter what
Difficult times can bring out the very best in people — war, a loss of a friend and even more. The U.S. Air Force has a tradition of honor, and a legacy of valor stretching back long before it was even called the Air Force. For retired Chief Master Sgt. Bill Gornik, this meant answering his nation’s call as an airman of the Army Air Corps in World War II. A 366th Fighter Wing Public Affairs heritage feature on AF Chief Master Sgt. (ret.) Bill Gornik, who started his career as an airman and engineer gunner of the Army Air Cops in World War II. In this feature, Gornik tells his story about his Air Force career as well as imparts some wisdom to today's generation of airmen.
0 9/17
2016
Italian exchange pilot Roberto Manzo, 74th Fighter Squadron training assistant, checks paperwork before a flight, Aug. 25, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. In September 2015, Manzo was chosen to participate in the exchange pilot program, which gives American pilots and coalition, or foreign ally, counterparts the opportunity to embed in another fighter squadron and master another airframe. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Janiqua P. Robinson) Italian exchange pilot lives thunder standard
Children dream. Some fantasize about winning the gold or being the best, but one young Italian boy’s childhood dream of becoming a pilot never died and years of hard work turned his dream into reality. Countless hours of hard work and perseverance took Capt. Roberto Manzo, 74th Fighter Squadron training assistant, from watching fighter jets in Italy to earning a spot in the Military Personnel Exchange Program and immersing himself into the world famous Flying Tigers.
0 9/13
2016
Combat Leaders Course students prepare to land during training in Florence, Ariz., Aug. 31, 2016. The pararescuemen obtain their 7-level certification and become team leaders after the vigorous course.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mya M. Crosby) Guardian Angel Combat Leaders Course put into action
It takes countless years of career field education, multiple deployments and temporary duty assignments to become a pararescue team leader. The 68th Rescue Flight executed a 65-day course for ten pararescuemen in a newly-designed course to develop their leadership abilities while obtaining their 7-level certification for their dynamic career field.
0 9/08
2016
An E-3 Sentry from the 965th Airborne Air Control Squadron, Tinker Air Force Base, Okla., taxis at Nellis AFB, Nev., Aug. 13, 2016. The Sentry played a vital role in suppressing enemy air defenses on the ground, air-to-air fights, and bombs dropped on targets by acting as the eyes and ears for the battle space during Red Flag 16-4. (U. S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Frank Miller) Tinker’s Sentry directs pieces of Red Flag puzzle with C2
When putting a puzzle together it helps to have an image of the picture the puzzle is trying to resemble. The E-3 Sentry, an airborne early-warning and control aircraft, helps other pieces of the ATO puzzle fit into place enhancing the air picture throughout entire missions at Red Flag 16-4.
0 9/06
2016
An F-15C Eagle from the 122nd Fighter Squadron, assigned to the 159th Fighter Wing, Louisiana Air National Guard, takes off during Red Flag 16-4 at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Aug. 24, 2016. Red Flag 16-4 conducted exercise missions to train pilots in a highly contested environment with coalition partners. (U. S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Frank Miller) ANG F-15C Eagle inserts air-to-air fight into Red Flag puzzle
When assembling a puzzle, a strategy sometimes used would be to build the edge pieces first to frame the overall image. The air-to-air combat role provided by the 122nd Fighter Squadron’s F-15C Eagles, assigned to the 159th Fighter Wing, Louisiana Air National Guard, would be an edge piece to the Air Tasking Order puzzle. The role they perform shapes the air picture for the entire mission.
0 9/06
2016
U.S. Air Force Airman Cassidy Gonzales, 23d Medical Operations Squadron mental health technician, grips the hand of Airman Giancarlo Carter, 23d Wing broadcast journalist apprentice, Aug. 31, 2016, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Since September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, Air Force leadership takes this time to remind Airmen about the power of wingmanship and emphasize the resources available to combat hard times. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Airman shares suicide story, raises awareness
“February seventh, I attempted to commit suicide," said Senior Airman Kirk Nelson, 23d Force Support Squadron honor guard head trainer. “That day I took eight [painkillers],” said U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Kirk Nelson, 23d Force Support Squadron honor guard head trainer. “My body was shaking and I started throwing-up. I was lightheaded, standing outside in 32-degree weather and pouring sweat. People walking by asked if I was alright, but I wasn’t letting anybody know.” After roughly eight months, Nelson is ready to share how loss and stressors of daily military life inevitably brought the 27-year-old Airman to his breaking point with hopes his story will help others understand and prevent suicides.
0 9/01
2016
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Macy Benjamin, 355th Contracting Squadron contract administrator, prepares to perform a dead lift at the Haeffner Fitness and Sports Center at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Aug. 25, 2016. Benjamin uses weightlifting as a personal escape from everyday stressors. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ashley N. Steffen) Worth the weight
With her brow furrowed and teeth gritting as every muscle in her body tenses up, the dissonant sounds of metallic ringing, determined grunting, and echoed overhead music, constructs this 25-year-old bodybuilder’s place of serenity. Staff Sgt. Macy Benjamin finds her escape from everyday life within her workouts. Starting with a scarce amount of fitness knowledge, she began transforming herself from an average Airman to a fitness guru.
0 8/29
2016
Master Sgt. Angel McKenzie, 707th Communications Squadron operations superintendent, was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis back in 2003. MS is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and the body. The cause of MS is still unknown. For the first nine years of her diagnosis, she didn’t tell anyone except her leadership. Now, she is using her illness to shape the way she leads her troops. (U.S. Air Force graphic/Staff Sgt. AJ Hyatt) USAF Master Sergeant uses illness to shape her leadership
In September 2003, Angel McKenzie was a healthy senior airman, who had a line number for staff sergeant. She was working on the flight line as an aircraft maintenance Airman at Fairchild Air Force Base, when all of sudden she was plagued with a weakness on one side of her body that could not be explained. A month later, she lost vision in one eye and was struggling to pick up a tool box. After seeing a few doctors, she received a diagnosis that would change her life forever. She was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS).
0 8/18
2016
Military working dogs have been an integral part of military strategy from the Roman Army to the trenches of World Wars I and II. Today, 366th Security Forces Squadron handlers place their lives in the paws of their canine counterparts overseas and at home, relying on them to search-out contraband and take down terrorists. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Tech. Sgt. Samuel Morse) More than a ‘tool’
Military working dog: a type of dog that learns and performs various tasks such as scouting, guarding and contraband detection. These dogs have been used for thousands of years and have proven invaluable in current operations in Southwest Asia.Logisticians and planners may see them as numbers on a deployment document. For others, who have been on
0 8/12
2016
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