HomeNewsArticle Display

Offutt partners with USACE, gives tours to UNL students

University of Nebraska at Lincoln (UNL) students and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) tour guides pose in front of fuel tanks Aug. 23, 2019, at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Offutt is able to provide engineering students examples of high-profile projects by partnering with organizations like the USACE and UNL.

University of Nebraska at Lincoln (UNL) students and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) tour guides pose in front of fuel tanks Aug. 23, 2019, at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Offutt is able to provide engineering students examples of high-profile projects by partnering with organizations like the USACE and UNL. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kendra Williams)

Eric Bausch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Petroleum, Oil and Lubricants Mandatory Center of Expertise, acting chief, provides a tour of fueling systems to University of Nebraska at Lincoln students Aug. 23, 2019, at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Local USACE representatives explained that engineers and fueling specialists perform a mission-critical job that helps maintain operations at Offutt.

Eric Bausch, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Petroleum, Oil and Lubricants Mandatory Center of Expertise, acting chief, provides a tour of fueling systems to University of Nebraska at Lincoln students Aug. 23, 2019, at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Local USACE representatives explained that engineers and fueling specialists perform a mission-critical job that helps maintain operations at Offutt. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kendra Williams)

Gregory Etter, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Petroleum, Oil and Lubricants Mandatory Center of Expertise program manager, provides a tour of fueling systems to University of Nebraska at Lincoln students Aug. 23, 2019, at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. During the tour students gained insight to real-world examples of what their future careers may be.

Gregory Etter, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Petroleum, Oil and Lubricants Mandatory Center of Expertise program manager, provides a tour of fueling systems to University of Nebraska at Lincoln students Aug. 23, 2019, at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. During the tour students gained insight to real-world examples of what their future careers may be. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kendra Williams)

OFFUTT AIR FORCE BASE, Neb. --

Students from the University of Nebraska at Lincoln receive tours of Offutt Air Force Base’s fueling system from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers August 23, 2019.

In two hour-long tours, the students gained insight to real-world examples of what their future careers may be.

Team Offutt is actively building and fostering connections in the community. By partnering with organizations like the USACE and UNL, Offutt is able to provide engineering students examples of high-profile projects.

“This is the second time the USACE Omaha District has taken part as an employer showing students one of our job sites and the different opportunities that there are to work for the Corps of Engineers,” said U.S. Army Capt. Lance Peterson, USACE program manager.

Local USACE representatives explained that engineers and fueling specialists perform a mission-critical job that helps maintain operations at Offutt.

“The Offutt fueling system was designed and constructed by Omaha District and serves as a convenient venue for discussing the importance of the fueling mission around the world,” said Gregory Etter, USACE program manager.

The tour guides emphasized the way we configure the fuel system to survive and anticipate threats. Additionally, they included information detailing how the systems are designed in a consistent manner which provides the warfighter clean fuel worldwide.

“The students quickly gain an appreciation for the impacts they will have as designers of fueling systems,” Etter said.

One of the purposes of this program is to showcase opportunities available to local graduates in the area after graduation. Offutt and the USACE Omaha district hope they can raise interest in their missions in the area. 

“The students remained engaged throughout the tours and asked relevant questions, renewing my confidence that as future engineers they will make a real difference for the warfighter,” Etter said.