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  • Airmen partner toward quicker deployments

    Rescue Airmen from the 23d Wing visited the Devil Raiders of the 621st Contingency Response Wing (CRW), to better understand the essential assets to stand up rescue operations from bare-base situations. Although the 23d Wing’s mission to organize, train, equip and maintain combat-ready for Air Combat Command, and the 621st CRW focuses on rapidly organizing and standing up bare bases for Air Mobility Command aircraft, they both believed they could learn from each other.
  • JBLE Airman overcomes struggle by paying it forward

    As he drove home on an overcast winter’s day, an incessant flood of overly critical thoughts fueled feelings of defeat that consumed every moment since the blow horn was pressed to signal, “I quit.” U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Svoleantopoulos, 497th Operations Support Squadron weapons tactician, returned from the U.S. Air Force Pararescue Indoctrination Course much sooner than he anticipated.
  • Fitness for the fallen

    U.S. service members and their families participated in a Memorial Day Murph and Pararescue Workout event at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., May 29, 2017. The event included a variety of exercises and aimed to remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice for their country.
  • Royals support Exercise Rapid Rescue

    The 3d Airlift Squadron supported Exercise Rapid Rescue May 15-18, 2017, providing transportation and simulated aeromedical evacuation along the East Coast.
  • SERE meets SPEAR: Specialists convene for unique combative course

    Your transport aircraft has just crashed in a remote and hostile environment. You and only a handful of other troops have survived the crash. As you survey the surroundings, you notice a crowd of local inhabitants running toward the wreckage screaming wildly, with brows furrowed and fists clenched. The level of fear inside you begins to skyrocket. You’re now scanning the crowd for its weakest links, trying to formulate a progressive strategy with the little time you have before they make contact. Which combative system are you most confident to employ in order to save your own life? Self-defense is a major component of support provided by Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape specialists to troops who have a high risk of isolation in theater, such as downed-pilots and operators. Late last month, SERE specialists across the 23d Wing, along with Pararescuemen from the 68th Formal Training Unit convened at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, to attend a one-week personal defense course led by a special guest.
  • Pararescuemen hone edge with realistic training

    Master Sgt. Sean Kirsch has deployed to the Afghan theater, among other locations, numerous times during his 13-year career.  Kirsch is a pararescueman with the 83rd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron based at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. During those earlier deployments, Kirsch recalls responding to multiple combat rescue missions each day and has
  • A 10-minute test: JBLE PJ delivers daughter

    When U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Travis Shaw left for work the morning of Aug. 9, he couldn’t have imagined that just hours later, his combat lifesaving skills would be tested in an emergency situation most pararescue specialists don’t traditionally encounter.
  • Guardian Angel Combat Leaders Course put into action

    It takes countless years of career field education, multiple deployments and temporary duty assignments to become a pararescue team leader. The 68th Rescue Flight executed a 65-day course for ten pararescuemen in a newly-designed course to develop their leadership abilities while obtaining their 7-level certification for their dynamic career field.
  • Moody skies 'rain' PJs

    Pararescuemen from the 38th Rescue Squadron jump from an HC-130J Combat King II at 25,000 feet, Aug. 18, 2016, in the skies over Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Pararescuemen are qualified experts in Airborne and Military Free Fall operations, to include high-altitude, low opening techniques. Training jumps are typically conducted from 9,000 to 12,000 feet, but current deployed operations require an airdrop of 20,000 feet or more.
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