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  • What it means to serve

    Across the Department of Defense, military members dedicate themselves to protecting the United States and the American way of life through voluntary service. Just as individual Airmen, Soldiers, Marines and Sailors joined the military for different reasons and support their branches in diverse ways, each has a unique way of defining what it means to serve based on their experiences. For some 20th Fighter Wing Airmen, this is what it means to serve.
  • Enhancing careers one Airman at a time

    The 20th Force Support Squadron career assistance advisors serve the local populace as well as Team Shaw’s geographically separated unit personnel in 29 states and five countries. Fostering the force development for more than one thousand Airmen is no easy task, but it is accomplished every day by two Airmen at Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina.
  • Airman saves civilian from demise

    “I could see the light in the tunnel when I was on the tracks, but I knew I could move the guy with enough time to go, plus I wasn’t willing to stand back and watch the guy get hit, knowing I didn’t do anything or try.”
  • Wingmanship saves a life

    As new recruits in Basic Military Training, Airmen are taught the concept of wingmanship. Everywhere they go, they cannot leave their wingman behind; recruits march together, eat together and even sleep together. Wingmanship is the cornerstone of Air Force core values.
  • AF band member offers resiliency with free guitar lessons

    In line with the Comprehensive Airman Fitness model, Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Kaleth O. Wright says resiliency initiatives are a top priority for the Air Force. “A focus on resiliency ensures Airmen and their families are fully equipped with the necessary tools, support system and mentality to persevere through difficult situations while taking care of the mission, themselves and their families,” Wright said. For people looking to learn guitar without a huge investment, a Joint Base Langley-Eustis Airman may have an answer teaching free guitar lessons to help promote resiliency.
  • One team, one fight: feature II

    With all the training and preparation F-16CM Fighting Falcons and their pilots have to go through, someone has to track the status and data required for a pilot to safely “step” out of the door and onto the flight line. Aviation resource management Airmen take care of pilots assigned to all three Shaw fighter squadrons. These Airmen work together as a team in order to get the mission done, which means they usually travel with pilots wherever they go.
  • Once lost, now found: DPRK returns remains of 55 MIA service members

    On July 27, 1953, the Korean Armistice Agreement, signed by the United Nations Command, the Korean People's Army and the Chinese People's Volunteer Army, implemented a complete cessation of hostilities of the Korean War. For 65 years, the UNC has remained committed to enforcing the 1953 Armistice Agreement, which includes the return of fallen service members a reality that came true on July 27, 2018, when the UNC repatriated 55 cases of remains from the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.
  • The end of a paw-some career

    Vulkan, a military working dog for the 49th Security Forces Squadron, plays with his owner, Senior Airman William Hale, a MWD handler for the 49 SFS, before his retirement ceremony at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M., July 27, 2018. Vulkan's loyalty to his handlers allowed for the completion of more than 10,000 hours of explosive detection for Holloman, while also completing more than 2,000 random anti-terrorism measures and vehicle searches.
  • Air Force honors 480th ISRW Airman

    Recently, one of the 480th Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Wing’s exceptional Airmen, U. S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Melissa A. Beam, was recognized as one of the Air Force’s 2018 12 Outstanding Airmen of the Year in the senior noncommissioned officer category.
  • U.S. Receives Fallen Service Members’ Remains From North Korea

    The United Nations Command with support from U.S. Forces Korea today repatriated 55 cases of remains of fallen U.S. service members returned by the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, also known as North Korea, according to a news release. A U.S. cargo aircraft flew to Wonson, North Korea, to receive the remains and returned promptly to Osan Air Base, South Korea, the release said. Brooks will host a full honors ceremony for the fallen service members August 1. Immediately following that ceremony, the remains will be flown to Hawaii for further processing under the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency.
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