HomeNewsArticle Display

ACC rededicates Hyde building

Members of the Air Combat Command Directorate of Cyberspace and Information Dominance, rededicated the Major General John P. Hyde building with his widow, Elizabeth Hyde, during a ceremony May 23, 2019 at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia.

U.S. Air Force Col. Chad Raduege, Air Combat Command Directorate of Cyberspace and Information Dominance director, retired Lt. Gen. Harry Raduege, Maj. Gen. John P. Hyde’s executive officer, and retired Chief Master Sgt. Anthony Coppa, Maj. Gen. John P. Hyde’s senior enlisted advisor, attend the Maj. Gen. John P. Hyde building rededication ceremony at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, May 23, 2019. Both retired Airmen served alongside Hyde during his time as the commander of the Tactical Communications Area, Headquarter Tactical Air Command. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kaylee Dubois)

Members of the Air Combat Command Directorate of Cyberspace and Information Dominance, rededicated the Major General John P. Hyde building with his widow, Elizabeth Hyde, during a ceremony May 23, 2019 at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia.

U.S. Air Force Col. Chad Raduege, Air Combat Command Directorate of Cyberspace and Information Dominance director, helps Mrs. Elizabeth Hyde, Maj. Gen. John P. Hyde’s wife, retired Lt. Gen. Harry Raduege and retired Chief Master Sgt. Anthony Coppa, cut the ribbon at the Maj. Gen. John P. Hyde building rededication ceremony at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, May 23, 2019. The building was dedicated to Maj. Gen. Hyde in 2003 for his unwavering 31 years of service to the nation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kaylee Dubois)

Members of the Air Combat Command Directorate of Cyberspace and Information Dominance, rededicated the Major General John P. Hyde building with his widow, Elizabeth Hyde, during a ceremony May 23, 2019 at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia.

U.S. Air Force Col. Chad Raduege, Air Combat Command Directorate of Cyberspace and Information Dominance director, talks about Elizabeth Hyde, Maj. Gen. John P. Hyde’s widow, at the Maj. Gen. John P. Hyde building rededication ceremony at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, May 23, 2019. This was the first time Mrs. Hyde saw her husband’s name on the building dedicated to him. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Kaylee Dubois)

JOINT BASE LANGLEY-EUSTIS, Va. --

Members of the Air Combat Command Directorate of Cyberspace and Information Dominance, rededicated the Major General John P. Hyde building with his widow, Elizabeth Hyde, during a ceremony May 23, 2019 at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia.

 

Although Mrs. Hyde was present during the building dedication to her husband in 2003, Maj. Gen. Hyde’s name was not yet affixed, therefore this was the first time she saw his name on the building.

 

In 1957, Maj. Gen. Hyde commissioned into the U.S. Air Force and held many positions throughout the next 31 years of service to the nation including Tactical Communications Area commander at Langley Air Force Base. Maj. Gen. Hyde was known as a communications pioneer, leading Airmen and establishing policies which helped create the foundation for today’s ACC command and control systems.

 

Now 16 years later, Col. Chad Raduege, ACC A6 director, decided to rededicate the building back to the Hyde family.

 

“We honor the past in order to move forward into the future,” said Raduege. “The foundation that we build upon today is comprised of legendary leaders that have gone before us. Seven former ACC Directors of Communication are in attendance to help us celebrate the legacy of Maj. Gen. Hyde. What a legacy, what a future.”

 

With close family ties to the Hyde family, Raduege recalled several memories of playing in the A6 office he now holds. Raduege’s father, retired Lt. Gen. Harry Raduege, was Maj. Gen. Hyde’s executive officer. Along with Col. Raduege, his father and the senior enlisted advisor to Gen. Hyde, retired Chief Master Sgt. Anthony Coppa, shared memories about their time serving alongside the major general.

 

The Major General John P. Hyde building rededication came just before Memorial Day, in time for service members and their families to remember of all those who served before them and the sacrifices made.