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U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Henry Crankshaw, 755th Operations Support Squadron NCO in charge of aircrew flight equipment quality assurance, stands in front of a Cessna O-1F Bird Dog at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 13, 2015. Crankshaw served as a life support investigator for recovery team 3 during a Defense POW MIA (prisoner of war missing in action) Accounting Agency mission from May 12 to June 18, 2014. Crankshaw and his team were assigned to an O-1F aircraft crash site located in the Quang Tri Province of Vietnam. The team was able to identify the pilot of the aircraft and bring him home to the U.S. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Cheyenne A. Powers/ Released) Airman brings home an MIA of 50 years
Not every service member makes it home from U.S. conflicts with other countries. Some of America's servicemen have been missing in action for over 50 years. Yet, even though it's been half a century since some of these conflicts, the U.S. is still doing whatever it takes to bring those who were missing in action home. One Airman from D-M helped do
0 10/14
2015
Capt. Reni Angelova, 99th Medical Group practice manager, poses for a picture outside of the Mike O’Callaghan Federal Medical Center on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Oct. 7, 2015. Angelova speaks Russian, Bulgarian and English while possessing master’s degrees in economics, law, business administration as well as international relations. She has worked as a teacher and a border patrol agent at one of the busiest checkpoints in Bulgaria before immigrating to the United States. She recently served in the Office of Defense Coordination in Bulgaria as an interpreter under the Language Enabled Airman Program. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Siuta B. Ika) Nellis Airman 'LEAPs' into language program
Capt. Reni Angelova, 99th Medical Group practice manager, stumbled upon the Language Enabled Airman Program when she went in to take an annual test to maintain her foreign language proficiency."I speak few languages and had to go in because I was due for Defense Language Proficiency Testing testing," said Angelova.In addition to English, Angelova
0 10/13
2015
U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Bruce Davis, 527th Space Aggressor Squadron radio frequency transmission supervisor, shakes hands with Dr. Faiz Anwer, medical oncologist, at Banner-University Medical Center in Tucson, Ariz., July 2015. Anwer was the lead doctor during Davis’ bone marrow collection procedure, which was facilitated by the C.W. Bill Young Department of Defense Marrow Donor Program. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Chris Drzazgowski/Released) Airman provides vitality through marrow donation
One out of 540 members of the C.W. Bill Young Department of Defense Marrow Donor Program ever proceeds to donate marrow or stem cells. An Airman from Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, had the opportunity to be one of those donors.The C.W. Bill Young DoD Marrow Donor Program works exclusively with military personnel and their dependents, as well
0 9/24
2015
Staff Sgt. John Skipper, 57th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron Viper Aircraft Maintanence Unit aerospace propulsion craftsman, works on an engine generator at Detachment 13, 372nd Training Squadron on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Sept. 10, 2015. The objective for the specialized training was to teach Skipper how to take an engine generator a part and place it back together. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Rachel Loftis) Detachment 13 offers resources for aircraft maintenance training
An Air Education and Training Command detachment with approximately 35 instructors across 15 Air Force Specialty codes, is Nellis and Creech AFBs' primary technical training source for aircraft maintenance training.Providing specialized advanced training, Detachment 13, 372nd Training Squadron, based out of Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas, supports
0 9/24
2015
U.S. Air Force Airmen pose after winning the 2015 Armed Service Hockey Association National Capital Region tournament in Fredrick, M.D., Aug. 16, 2015. The hockey team was formed by Staff Sgt. Eric Luttrell, 10th Intelligence Squadron cyber transport craftsman, and the team is comprised of 25 members stationed at Langley Air Force Base, Va. (Courtesy photo by Mike Duggan) Airmen form hockey team
The sound of blades scraping ice, wooden sticks slapping together and the undeniable chill that forces its way through the body are clear indicators of a hockey game, but for the players, that game is much more than just sounds and shivers, especially for the members of the newly formed Langley Raptors.U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Eric Luttrell, 10th
0 9/23
2015
Troy Blaschko, 57th Maintenance Group Corrosion shop aircraft painter, demonstrates how to scuff sand an F-16 Fighting Falcon inside a temperature-controlled building on Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., Sept. 8, 2015. Blaschko is preparing the aircraft to undergo a full paint job. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mikaley Kline) Corrosion shop gives aircraft new 'shades'
The harsh fluorescent lights shine brightly down on an F-16 Fighting Falcon that resembles a child's unfinished toy aircraft model.With half its two-toned brown paint sanded away and swirls of green underneath the paint the F-16 looks as if it had been submerged under water for 50 years rather than just coming off the flightline at Nellis Air Force
0 9/21
2015
U.S. Army Pvt. Tony Gargano, World War II prisoner of war, holds a prayer book at his residence in Tucson, Ariz., Aug. 20, 2015. Gargano carried the little prayer book with him during his time as a POW, tallying each day they marched, in the book, totaling to 30 days. During the march, the POWs had to beg for food, barely surviving off of one meal a day. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ashley N. Steffen/Released) The struggle of an imprisoned warrior
Sweat and water mingled in dripping beads, caressing the cheeks of muddied Soldiers in a land rotting with war.It was early in the morning; the world was still black with a sleeping sun. In anticipation, U.S. Army Pvt. Tony Gargano, in Fox Company, waited to launch a secret attack on the German soldiers' front line.Not all were willing to fight;
0 9/17
2015
Malcolm Johnson, World War II veteran and former prisoner of war, tells his story at the Tucson Veterans Center in Tucson, Ariz., Aug. 18, 2015. Johnson was a civilian contractor when he was captured in December 1941. Nearly five years after being captured, Johnson was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with Valor in 1947. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Chris Massey/Released) Malcolm Johnson, civilian Prisoner of War
Ninety-four-year-old Malcolm "Mickey" Johnson sits in his wheelchair wearing a maroon baseball cap with the words "Survivors of Wake Guam-Cavite" written in light blue letters. Johnson's step-son and daughter-in-law sit attentively while he talks about his experience as a civilian prisoner of war.In April of 1941, Johnson was 19 years old when he
0 9/16
2015
Retired U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Ray Frazier reflects on his time as a prisoner of war during the Korean War at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Aug. 28, 2015. Frazier joined the army when he was 16 years old, and had to lie about his age just to get in. After serving for two years as a medical NCO, he was captured in South Korea by Chinese soldiers. He spent 865 days, five hours and 15 minutes as a POW in North Korea. Once liberated, Frazier continued to serve in the Army and retired after 22 years of service. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Senior Airman Cheyenne A. Powers/Released) A prisoner's war
It began as a civil war, but would soon become an international affair when the United Nations decided to join and support South Korea against North Korea and its ally, the People's Republic of China. One man found himself caught in the middle of it all.Ray "Doc" Frazier, was a young man living in Tennessee with his grandparents and two siblings
0 9/15
2015
Daniel Salinas, a Khobar Towers bombing survivor, poses for a photo Sept. 9
at Holloman Air Force Base, N.M. The Khobar Towers, located near Dhahran,
Saudi Arabia, were bombed June 25, 1996, killing 19 service members and
wounding 372 more. Salinas, who was deployed as the staff sergeant of
safety, was injured in the blast. Salinas currently works as the 49th Wing
Occupational Safety Technician. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class
Emily A. Kenney)  
Salinas: A Survivor's Story
As Dan Salinas began running his normal 3-mile loop, he would always look to his right and see children and parents playing under the bright lights of the park.But, something felt off about that night. He realized there were no lights on, and no children or parents in sight.The park was closed.That June night the sweet smell of flowers blooming
0 9/15
2015
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