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U.S. Air Force Gen. Mike Holmes, commander of Air Combat Command, right, poses for a photo with U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Walter E. Piatt, 10th Mountain Division commander, during his visit to the 20th Air Support Operations Squadron and 10th Mountain Division, Oct. 9, 2017, at Fort Drum, N.Y. Holmes visited Airmen belonging to the 14th, 20th and 682d ASOS, and 18th Weather Squadron Detachment 1 during Warfighters Exercise 18-1, to observe Airmen fully engaged in roles they would fill for the Army while downrange. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson) ACC commander witnesses integrated readiness
The commander of Air Combat Command visited Airmen belonging to the 18th Air Support Operations Group, during Warfighters Exercise 18-1, Oct. 9, 2017, at Fort Drum.Gen. Mike Holmes observed the WFX, which is designed to test a commander’s ability to direct their forces and successfully defeat the enemy. WFX 18-1 tested the 10th Mountain Division
0 10/12
2017
Airman 1st Class Isaiah Randall, 23d Equipment Maintenance Squadron aircraft structural maintenance apprentice, poses for a photo, Oct. 2, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Among four months of turmoil, Randall came to understand the true concept of resiliency, leaning on the support from his family, both by blood and by service, and God to guide him through. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Airman counters life's jabs
God. Family. Boxing. That’s all that matters. But life’s unpredictable ups and downs often test people in ways that shake the foundations that give them peace. His father was shot, his aunt died and his grandmother was diagnosed with cancer. The rage, devastation and sorrow caused by family turmoil left him reeling. He looked for inner peace in his longtime passion, boxing, but a torn ligament left him staggering. With nowhere to turn, Airman 1st Class Isaiah Randall came to understand the true concept of resiliency, leaning on the support from his family, both by blood and by service, and God to guide him through.
0 10/12
2017
1st Lt. Kaitlin Toner, 23d Wing Public Affairs officer, speaks during a Violence Prevention Awareness event, Oct. 4, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Moody leadership proclaimed October as Violence Prevention Awareness Month in order to recognize and educate Airmen and families about suicide prevention, drug abuse, stalking awareness and domestic violence prevention. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) Moody hosts first-ever Violence Prevention Awareness Event
The 23d Wing hosted Moody’s first Violence Prevention Awareness Event recognizing suicide prevention, drug abuse, stalking awareness and domestic violence prevention, Oct. 4, 2017, here. During the event, Col. Jennifer Short, 23d Wing commander, and Col. Jeffery Valenzia, 93d Air Ground Operations Wing commander, signed a proclamation declaring October as Violence Prevention Awareness Month.
0 10/10
2017
Capt. Abby Wilkins, an Alpha Warrior competitor and qualifier for the regional competition, navigates the final obstacle during a qualifying run through an Alpha Warrior battle rig, Sept. 27, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. The Alpha Warrior program was adopted by the Air Force in support of the Comprehensive Airmen Fitness pillars: mental, social, physical and spiritual. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Moody holds Alpha Warrior prelims
Airmen are battling for the title of ‘Alpha Warrior’ Sept. 27 to Oct. 6, at Moody Air Force Base. The Alpha Warrior program was adopted by the Air Force in support of the Comprehensive Airmen Fitness pillars: mental, social, physical and spiritual. The program consists of varying obstacle courses resembling those seen in NBC’s American Ninja Warrior.
0 9/29
2017
Master Sgt. Terri Adams, 23d Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management section chief, left, talks to the Uyeno family at a local pet store, Sept. 23, 2017, in Valdosta, Ga. Members of the 23d CES hosted the event as part of National Preparedness Month to educate pet owners on disaster precautions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Erick Requadt) 23d CES speaks up for pets, helps prepare owners
Members of the 23d Civil Engineer Squadron, along with the American Red Cross, held a National Preparedness Month event, Sept. 23, here. The event revolved around the 23d CES handing out free items to spread awareness about how pet owners can better prepare if a disaster hits.
0 9/26
2017
A U.S. Air Force pilot from the 79th Rescue Squadron conducts a preflight check on an HC-130J Combat King II before deploying to south Fla., in response to Hurricane Irma from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Sept. 9, 2017. Approximately 80 Airmen from the 563rd Rescue Group deployed to south Fla., to execute recovery operations after the Category 4 hurricane ripped through the Florida Keys. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Chris Drzazgowski) 563rd RQG deploys assets in response to Hurricane Irma
Approximately 80 Airmen from the 563rd RQG deployed to south Fla., in support of recovery operations after the Category 4 hurricane ripped through the Florida Keys one day earlier.
0 9/14
2017
Members of the 23d Aircraft Maintenance Squadron prepare an A-10C Thunderbolt II to be washed, Aug. 28, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Maintenance procedures require that A-10s are washed at least every 180 days to prevent maintenance issues and safety hazards to the pilot. Since strong chemicals are used to clean the aircraft Airmen must wear personal protective equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) A 23d Wing ‘hawg’ gets a bath
What has roughly 40 teeth, sounds like ‘brrrt,’ and occasionally needs a bath? The 23d Wing’s A-10C Thunderbolt IIs, also known as ‘Hawgs,’ are subject to an assortment of scheduled maintenance appointments to include washes every 180 days or approximately 1,000 flying hours. “It’s extremely important that maintenance keeps the aircraft clean,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Thomas Harney, 75th Fighter Squadron director of operations and A-10 pilot. “Every time we fire the gun, gases flow up and cover the aircraft with grease which can affect operational components of the aircraft and the pilot’s visibility.”
0 9/01
2017
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. John San Inocencio, 23d Logistics Readiness Squadron, holds onto a fuel line hose as Tech. Sgt. Shayna Jacoby, 23d Logistics Readiness Squadron, squeegees the hose to remove the remaining fuel following a refuel Aug. 31, 2017, at Jack Brooks Regional Airport in Beaumont, Texas. Air Force keeps rescue operations fueled
The Berlin Airlift marked an historical period in U.S. military innovation, the ability to resupply a blockaded city in Germany. As Hurricane Harvey wreaked havoc on South Texas, the storm left areas of Texas flooded and completely unreachable by land. Airmen from 71st Rescue Squadron and 23d Logistics Readiness Squadron conducting forward area refueling point operations were the life blood to air search and rescue missions going Aug. 31, 2017 in Beaumont, Texas. Bringing refueling capabilities to an area cut off by water, the 71st Rescue Squadron utilized the FARP capabilities of the HC-130J Combat King IIs to extend missions out of Jack Brooks Regional Airport to support search and rescue operations.
0 9/01
2017
Default Air Force Logo Be memorable, inspire future generations
Staff Sgts. Stan Mason, Charlie Jefferson, Doc Lawrence, and Master Sgt. Kenneth G. Webb. None of you know these individuals, but their legacy and efforts as supervisors are evident.These NCOs were my very first influences in the Air Force and the reason I am wearing these chevrons today.Front-line supervisors have the greatest impact on the Air
0 8/29
2017
Both 23d Component Maintenance Squadron propulsion technicians, Airman 1st Class Anthony Guevara, left, and Airman 1st Class Jesse Mendheim, disassemble a TF-34 engine used in A-10C Thunderbolt lls, Jan. 25, 2017, at Moody Air Force Base, Ga. Airmen pay close attention to detail while systematically breaking the engine down. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider) Continuous Process Improvement bears fruit
The investment in Airmen’s ideas through a Continuous Process Improvement event this past January has Moody’s propulsion team displaying measurable improvements in the timeliness and effectiveness of supporting the A-10C Thunderbolt II’s increased flying mission. Over the last seven months, The 23d Component Maintenance Squadron has gradually implemented the ideas from approximately 20 civilians and Airmen from almost every enlisted rank to better maintain the TF-34 engine used in A-10s. The results speak for themselves. “We have seen our Airmen at all levels react positively to the initiative,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Michael Irwin, 23d CMS former commander during the CPI event. “The men and women at the Propulsion flight have completely embraced the idea of continuous improvement and they want to be the best! You can feel that excitement every time you visit their facility.”
0 8/17
2017
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