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Train like you fight: Recce MWDs receive new training area

The 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog unit recently completed a new training area designed to enhance the companionship between handlers and their dogs

Staff Sgt. Christopher Fitchett, 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, prepares to catch his MWD Bady 2, June 27, 2018, at Beale Air Force Base, California. MWDs can detect either bombs or drugs and play a key role in base security. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan D. Viglianco)

The 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog unit recently completed a new training area designed to enhance the companionship between handlers and their dogs

Bady 2, 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog, lays in a tube June 27, 2018, at Beale Air Force Base, California. A dog’s sense of smell is 40 times greater than a human’s allowing them to detect drugs and explosives. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan D. Viglianco)

The 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog unit recently completed a new training area designed to enhance the companionship between handlers and their dogs

Staff Sgt. Christopher Fitchett, 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, and Bady 2, his MWD, prepare to run the obstacle course June 27, 2018, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The MWD kennel recently completed a new training area featuring obstacles, shaded overhangs, and a turf field. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan D. Viglianco)

The 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog unit recently completed a new training area designed to enhance the companionship between handlers and their dogs

Staff Sgt. Christopher Fitchett, 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, watches his MWD Bady 2, June 27, 2018, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The MWD kennel recently completed a new training area featuring obstacles, shaded overhangs, and a turf field. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan D. Viglianco)

The 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog unit recently completed a new training area designed to enhance the companionship between handlers and their dogs

Senior Airman Jarred Uzeta, 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, commands his MWD Vvladimir to walk across a balance beam June 27, 2018, at Beale Air Force Base, California. MWDs can detect either bombs or drugs and play a key role in base security. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan D. Viglianco)

The 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog unit recently completed a new training area designed to enhance the companionship between handlers and their dogs

Senior Airman Jarred Uzeta, 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog handler, commands his MWD Vvladimir to jump through an obstacle June 27, 2018, at Beale Air Force Base, California. MWDs can detect either bombs or drugs and play a key role in base security. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan D. Viglianco)

The 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog unit recently completed a new training area designed to enhance the companionship between handlers and their dogs

The 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog kennel recently completed a new training area featuring obstacles, shaded overhangs, and a turf field a few weeks ago. The new area cost approximately $250,000 and took about a year to complete. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan D. Viglianco)

The 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog unit recently completed a new training area designed to enhance the companionship between handlers and their dogs

Vvladimir, 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog, runs away from his handler Senior Airman Jarred Uzeta while carrying a tug June 27, 2018, at Beale Air Force Base, California. A dog’s sense of smell is 40 times greater than a human’s allowing them to detect drugs and explosives. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan D. Viglianco)

The 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog unit recently completed a new training area designed to enhance the companionship between handlers and their dogs

Bady 2, 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog, apprehends Senior Airman Patrick Saddoris, 9th SFS MWD handler, during training June 27, 2018, at Beale Air Force Base, California. MWDs can detect either bombs or drugs and play a key role in base security. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan D. Viglianco)

The 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog unit recently completed a new training area designed to enhance the companionship between handlers and their dogs
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Bady 2, 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog, chases Senior Airman Patrick Saddoris, 9th SFS MWD handler, during training June 27, 2018, at Beale Air Force Base, California. The MWD kennel recently completed a new training area featuring obstacles, shaded overhangs, and a turf field. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Tristan D. Viglianco)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

The 9th Security Forces Squadron military working dog unit recently completed a new training area designed to enhance the companionship between handlers and their dogs

 

The area provides a safer training environment and it features a shaded overhangs to keep it cool, a turf field, and a variety of training obstacles, which mimic real-world obstacles.

 

”The new complex is a great place to train and the dogs seem to enjoy the area,” said Senior Airman Jarred Uzeta, 9th SFS MWD handler. “It gives them shade and more room to move around.”

 

Uzeta also said the area is an improvement on their old training area because it features concrete obstacles instead of plastic and has less insects which bother the dogs.

 

Having the area located right by their work center allows the dogs to become familiar with the area and is more convenient for the handlers.

 

“Working out here in the shade instead of going out and working in an area they are not familiar with allows us to work them off-leash” said Uzeta. “We take the dogs out and start doing basic obedience with them, run the obstacle course, and just let them be dogs out here.”

 

According to Staff Sgt. Christopher Fitchett, 9th SFS MWD handler, the area took roughly a year to complete and cost approximately $250,000 and he believes it will help the dogs overcome different scenarios they may face while apprehending a suspect.

 

“The course helps us do our job by allowing us to put the dogs through different uncomfortable scenarios,” said Fitchett. “This helps them accomplish tasks outside the area in day-to-day operations.”