HomeNewsArticle Display

ROTC cadets tour SJAFB

Airmen assigned to Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, hosted ROTC cadets from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University April 8 to 9, 2021.

A group of ROTC cadets from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University wave as F-15E Strike Eagles take off and land at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, April 8, 2021. The cadets toured several units across the installation for the opportunity to explore different career fields and experience life as an active duty officer. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jordan Colvin)

Airmen assigned to Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, hosted ROTC cadets from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University April 8 to 9, 2021.

An ROTC cadet from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University digs a hole to bury an explosive during a training exercise at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, April 8, 2021. The exercise made cadets aware of different ways explosives could be hidden in a deployed environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jordan Colvin)

Airmen assigned to Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, hosted ROTC cadets from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University April 8 to 9, 2021.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Brian Price, 4th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordinance Disposal journeyman, teaches ROTC cadets from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University how to identify different missiles at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, April 8, 2021. EOD is trained to identify explosives of all different shapes and sizes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jordan Colvin)

Airmen assigned to Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, hosted ROTC cadets from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University April 8 to 9, 2021.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Alan Downs, 4th Operations Support Squadron survival, evasion, resistance and escape specialist, teaches ROTC cadets from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University the basics of how to use their surroundings for survival at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, April 8, 2021. SERE is a training program that prepares U.S. military personnel, U.S. Department of Defense civilians, and private military contractors to survive and "return with honor" in survival scenarios. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jordan Colvin)

Airmen assigned to Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, hosted ROTC cadets from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University April 8 to 9, 2021.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Joshua Krape, 4th Operations Support Squadron survival, evasion, resistance and escape specialist, middle, sets off a smoke grenade during an ROTC tour at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, April 8, 2021. The demonstration showed cadets from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University how smoke grenades are used for signaling and marking areas which are able to be seen from long distances. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jordan Colvin)

Airmen assigned to Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, hosted ROTC cadets from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University April 8 to 9, 2021.

U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Earl Williams III, 4th Operations Group deputy commander, speaks with ROTC cadets from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University during a commander’s panel at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, April 8, 2021. The commander’s panel gave the cadets an opportunity to ask questions about the military journey they might encounter. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman Jordan Colvin)

SEYMOUR JOHNSON AIR FORCE BASE, N.C. --

Airmen assigned to Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina, hosted ROTC cadets from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University April 8 to 9, 2021.

The visit afforded the cadets the opportunity to explore different career fields and experience life as an active duty officer.

“There’s only so much that can be learned from inside the classroom,” said Master Sgt. Chemere Jones, 4th Fighter Wing career assistance advisor. “Introducing the young men and women from Detachment 605 to the 4th FW mission allowed the cadets to experience a more practical, hands-on approach to learning in areas of expeditionary training and principles of leadership.”

During the tour, cadets met with service members from a variety of career fields to include medical, security forces, explosive ordinance disposal and survival, evasion, resistance and escape to learn more about the day-to-day operations.

“In addition to these interesting experiences, I gained more knowledge about aircraft maintenance by going out onto the flight line and hearing from officer and enlisted maintenance personnel while getting to see the F-15E Strike Eagle up close,” said Cadet Maj. William Meshack, a third-year cadet at N.C. A&T.

These types of tours help the Air Force as it continues to accelerate, change and develop future leaders by providing opportunities to showcase current techniques, tactics and procedures. The visit also helped solidify future career paths that may not have been previously considered by the cadets.

“I am currently waiting to hear back from the rated board to know if I will have to the opportunity to become a pilot,” said Meshack. “However, because of this trip, aircraft maintenance has become a strong secondary option for me. I’m really grateful for this opportunity to see the Air Force up close and personal.”