HomeNews

News Search

Results:
Tag: Suicide Awareness
Clear
  • Be there for your wingman

    Photo illustration representing the Airmen that have been lost to suicide and how a wingman should be there for an Airman struggling with suicide ideation and depression August 30th, 2019, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho. The Ask, Care, Escort (ACE) initiative is one of the ways the Air Force compels wingman to open the conversation about
  • Refusing to be a bystander

    A Grand Forks Air Force Base Airman shares a story detailing her successful efforts in preventing a friend's potential suicide.
  • CAS Close Airman Support

    Davis-Monthan’s Airmen are known to be strong, resilient and hard-charging. Time and time again the base has proven to be one of the best and has never backed down from the high end fight. The base and the Airmen have gone through many changes that have resulted in a higher operation tempo with very little room to fail. However, all of the hard work and dedication our Airmen provide can come at a cost.
  • The monster within

    The monster within -- A letter to those suffering in silence
  • Airmen helping Airmen: Suicide prevention

    Charged with the safety of every American against all enemies, both foreign and domestic, military members are expected to perform in highly stressful environments. Airmen deal with everyday stressors that come with wearing the uniform, and issues that arise both on and off the battlefield.These challenges eventually become too much for some to bear. According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, 22 Veterans commit suicide every day and according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 40,000 people commit suicide every year in the U.S. alone.
  • A place to belong: Part II

    Tech. Sgt. Martin Rodriguez experienced a variety of bad situations while serving in the military, from deployments to hostile work environments to the threat of being discharged, but he was living a secret alternate life that could of had devastating consequences.
  • Every Airman plays a role in suicide prevention

    The Air Force is determined to prevent suicide, but an Airman doesn’t need to be a specialist or doctor to do that. Sometimes all it takes is starting a conversation. Everyone has a role to play. That’s a key part of the Defense Department’s #BeThere campaign, which encourages making a difference through every day connections.
  • Suicide prevention – hopes for the future

    To some, suicide prevention seems like a topic that is discussed without any definite solution. Every Airman sits through the annual briefings and trainings and hears the statistics that go along with them, yet suicide remains a problem within the DOD. Although there may never be a definite solution to end suicide, it is important that we all have an understanding of how to get through the hard times we face. Before I joined the Air Force, I was personally affected by the suicide of someone I knew. It left me feeling like it was a mystery that will never be solved.
RSS