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  • DoD launches effort to collect 8,000 units of COVID-19 convalescent plasma

    Patients who have recovered from COVID-19 may hold treatment in their veins that could help others who are critically ill with the respiratory infection.
  • Airmen must resist complacency, adhere to social distancing guidelines

    The COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten the lives of hundreds of thousands of people around the world. One-in-five cases in the U.S. requiring hospitalization are people between the ages of 20 and 44. One-third of Department of Defense cases are in intensive care units. All Airmen are vulnerable, and overcoming this threat requires our entire Air Force working together. Airmen must do everything possible to protect themselves, others in their local community, and their Wingmen.
  • The Air Force is protecting Airmen while protecting nation

    How do you stand “shoulder to shoulder” in a time of COVID-19? For the United States Air and Space Forces, and indeed the entire United States military, this is no small question. It is so pressing, in fact, that the Air Force’s medical staff, in collaboration with experts nationwide, have been working nearly around the clock to answer it. It’s not hard to understand why.
  • Air Force warns Airmen of electronic cigarette risks

    The Air Force, much like the civilian population, is seeing a decrease in traditional tobacco use, but an increase in e-cigarette use.
  • Air Force transitions all U.S. military treatment facilities to DHA administration and management

    This October, U.S.-based Air Force military treatment facilities transferred administration and management to the Defense Health Agency. Congress directed this transfer in the fiscal year 2017 National Defense Authorization Act. Establishing an integrated Military Health System will standardize health care delivery and business operations across all military treatment facilities.
  • JB Langley surgical team goes 'purple'

    A joint surgical team comprised of three separate branches assembled at U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, in December 2018 to perform an operation. Consisting of a Navy surgeon, Air Force nurse, and Army technician, the team was organized to perform a functional endoscopic sinus surgery to restore a patient’s sinus ventilation to normal function. Providing health care in a joint environment works to improve readiness by ensuring that health care providers have the capabilities they need while providing patients with convenient access to care.
  • ACC Command Surgeon on today’s, tomorrow’s medical operations

    Brig. Gen. Paul Friedrichs is the Command Surgeon, Headquarters Air Combat Command at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, shares personal and professional perspectives on Air Force life and military medicine.
  • Steady and ready: C-130 mainstay of medevac

    Since the Vietnam War, the C-130 Hercules has been a workhorse of aeromedical evacuation, and continues to serve as a reliable platform to move patients over long distances, allowing Airmen to provide critical care in the air, aid in disaster relief efforts, and bring warfighters home.
  • Air Force begins transition of hospitals, clinics to the Defense Health Agency

    The Defense Health Agency officially assumed administrative and management responsibilities of a handful of hospitals and clinics as part of the Military Health System reforms mandated by Congress. The transition of the facilities is part of a phased implementation plan developed by DHA and Services medical departments that begins on Oct. 1, 2018.
  • Robotics key to medical Airmen recruitment, retention, readiness

    With surgical robots becoming the standard of care across many specialties, the Air Force Medical Service is keeping up with the latest advancements to provide the best patient care and maintain Airman readiness. Robotics has been the standard for years in the private sector, especially in OB-GYN and urology,” said Maj. Joshua Tyler, director of robotics at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi. “The Air Force is bringing those same advancements in surgical robotics and technology that we see in the private sector into the hands of our surgeons and operating room medics.” Access to surgical robotics can also help surgeons treat a higher volume of patients, which also improves readiness.
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