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  • Goldfein emphasizes protecting force from COVID-19 while fulfilling all missions, operational priorities

    Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David L. Goldfein said March 18 there have been seven confirmed cases of the new coronavirus to date among active-duty personnel, but that the Air Force is “still conducting global missions … which is priority one.”
  • Medical standards changing for RPA pilots

    The Air Force has approved changes to medical standards for remotely piloted aircraft pilots, which went into effect February 28.
  • 99th MDG wins AF Hospital of the Year, shows zero signs of slowing up

    From treating major mishaps to delivering babies, these medics have proven they are without a doubt the best in the business. The 99 MDG won the 2019 Air Force Surgeon General Hospital of the Year Award.
  • Air Force studies fatigue, sleep to enhance readiness

    Researchers with the Air Force Research Laboratory 711th Human Performance Wing, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, are looking for ways to better equip Airmen and their leadership with crucial data to ensure that Airmen are getting the necessary rest to maximize mission execution. A team of human performance experts is looking at sleep and fatigue from several perspectives. They are tracking sleep habits in pilots and other operators, while also evaluating sleep-monitoring technology to ensure its accuracy and ability to work in an operational setting.
  • Air Force warns Airmen of electronic cigarette risks

    The Air Force, much like the civilian population, is seeing a decrease in traditional tobacco use, but an increase in e-cigarette use.
  • C-17 Globemaster III: An aircraft as versatile as AE crews

    Larger, faster and flexible – a flying ICU. Since joining the U.S. Air Force fleet in 1993, the C-17 Globemaster III has significantly expanded aeromedical evacuation capabilities. In addition to its transport and other numerous mission sets, the C-17 converts to provide aeromedical evacuation to patients in a broad variety of conditions. The aircraft has played critical roles in various contingencies, bringing warfighters to higher levels of care, bringing patients home to the U.S., and aiding in humanitarian efforts to save the lives of those impacted by natural disasters.
  • AF deploys metrics, quantifies value of medical readiness

    As the Defense Health Agency assumes management of Air Force military treatment facilities, one of the most important challenges facing the Air Force is its ability to maintain the readiness mission hospitals and clinics support.
  • Phase 1 of DHA transition set to begin

    The Defense Health Agency will assume responsibility for the administration and management of healthcare at all military medical treatment facilities through a phased approached starting Oct. 1, 2018. Seymour Johnson Air Force Base is also on the list of clinics to begin the first phase. Col. Craig Keyes, 4th Medical Group commander, is looking to have a smooth transition within the first phase and is committed to working hand-in-hand with the DHA to execute a successful transition and minimize impact to the delivery of care. The transition is mandated by 2017 National Defense Authorization Act to improve access to quality care for beneficiaries, while enhancing readiness by redefining the roles of the military medical departments and the DHA. These changes were passed with the intent to create an integrated, efficient and effective system of readiness and health that better supports the lethality of the force. Each Service, however, will remain responsible for operational mission support and readiness.
  • Alcohol’s insidious nature: Getting help empowers your career

    Alcohol abuse has a deceptively gradual onset that can slowly affect family, friends and work. Knowing the signs and getting help early are key to beating alcohol abuse.
  • Ready today, ready tomorrow - Air Force prepares for the future of medical readiness

    The future of warfare is uncertain, and tomorrow’s conflicts may not look like today’s. To prepare for this uncertainty, the Air Force is assessing how it prepares its medical forces to support the warfighter.
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