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  • Thunderbirds aircraft mishap

    A U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds pilot was killed when his F-16 Fighting Falcon crashed over the Nevada Test and Training Range April 4, 2018, at approximately 10:30 a.m. during a routine aerial demonstration training flight. The identity of the pilot is being withheld for 24-hours pending next of kin

  • NEWS RELEASE: F-16D THUNDERBIRD ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED

    Excess airspeed and insufficient stopping distance on a wet runway resulted in an F-16D being overturned and destroyed upon landing at Dayton International Airport, Ohio, June 23, 2017, according to an Accident Investigation Board report released today. The pilot sustained injuries and the

  • NEWS RELEASE: MQ-9A ABBREVIATED ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED

    Release No: 05112017-1Date: May 11, 2017A pilot’s misprioritization of checklist tasks and failure to observe aircraft warnings led to the crash of an MQ-9A Reaper remotely-piloted aircraft on the Nevada Test and Training Range June 7, 2016, according to an Air Combat Command Abbreviated Accident

  • NEWS RELEASE: TU-2S ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION RELEASED

    A TU-2S crashed Sept. 20, 2016 near Sutter, Calif., during a training mission after the aircraft entered an unintentional secondary stall and the two pilots ejected, according to an Air Combat Command Accident Investigation Board report released today.During the ejection sequence, the instructor

  • NEWS RELEASE: MQ-1B PREDATOR ACCIDENT REPORT RELEASED

    A mechanical failure leading the engine to overheat caused the crash of an MQ-1B Predator Oct. 19, 2015, according to an Abbreviated Accident Investigation Board report released today.  The aircraft was conducting a surveillance mission in support of Operation Inherent Resolve at an undisclosed

  • Point of Recovery: Ground Collision Avoidance System saving pilots lives

    Frantic calls of “Two recover, Two recover, Two recover,” echoed across the airwaves.Maj. Luke O’Sullivan, F-16 Fighting Falcon instructor pilot, watched helplessly from his cockpit as his student’s jet descended from an altitude of over 3 miles to under 4,400 feet in a matter of seconds.While