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  • Suicide Prevention Walk Brings H.O.P.E

    Every day, approximately 123 individuals take their own lives in the United States. Of those individuals, U.S. military members and veterans make up 18 percent of adult suicides.
  • Mental health providers, leadership partner for deployment resiliency, readiness

    Deployed mental health providers work closely with leadership to help maintain warfighter resiliency and readiness. Service members are away from their usual support systems during deployment, and because the environment and stress puts them in unusual situations, they require innovative and flexible forms of mental health care.
  • Deploying mental health care downrange

    Deployed mental health providers play a vital role in delivering medical care downrange, ensuring the health of the warfighter and the mission. Even though service members who deploy are medically ready, both physically and mentally, the rigors of deployment can take a toll.
  • Resilient kids, ready Airmen

    One thing Airmen worry about when they deploy is the well-being of their family, especially children who may have a hard time coping with the challenges that come with a parent’s deployment. The impact of deployment on children is a key component of Airmen readiness. Knowing their family is well helps Airmen focus on the mission.
  • A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD

    Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty. One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.
  • A peek behind the curtain: The first step of PTSD care

    Perhaps the most difficult part of seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder is making that first appointment, since Airmen are often unsure of what to expect. Not knowing what to expect from mental health providers can get in the way of effective PTSD treatment.
  • A peak behind the curtain: PTSD barriers and stigmas

    Effective treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder is possible, but many Airmen falsely think seeking medical help for PTSD will hurt their career and will not help them get better. These stigmas and misconceptions create perceived barriers, preventing Airmen from seeking care. Delaying treatment can cause the anxiety and fear following a traumatic event to affect an Airman’s readiness.
  • A day in the life: Mental health supports Airmen, readiness

    As with any Air Force healthcare provider, Capt. Daniel Gibson, a clinical psychologist with the 92nd medical group, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, relies on a collaborative, patient-centered approach to care.The mental health clinic at Fairchild Air Force Base uses a collaborative approach to ensure the best patient care.
  • Mental Health trailblazes new IOP in ACC

    Moody Air Force Base’s Mental Health Flight refocused its treatment strategy, Feb. 5, by instituting a new intensive outpatient program (IOP) that gives Airmen the help they need from Airmen like themselves. This new program is designed to provide a more streamlined service for the nearly 7000 appointments held by the Mental Health office each year, while maintaining the quality standard of excellence for each patient.
  • Breaking the stigma: Herschel Walker spotlights mental fitness to D-M Airmen

    Herschel Walker, former NFL running back and Patriot Support Program spokesman, shared his experiences about leadership and mental illness with Airmen and civilians at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., Oct. 4.
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