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  • Airman overcomes series of challenges relying on superb resiliency

    It was the first night in a while that she’d slept so soundly. Unfortunately, it was the one night she wishes she hadn’t. Murphy’s Law continued a long streak of unfolding in Janelle’s life. One incident after another. It was enough to yank the cheer right out of the average person, but not her. U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Janelle Vicente is a seasoned veteran when it comes to mental resiliency.
  • PTSD: Seeking out mental health care is the first step to wellness

    Service members, family members and veterans who suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder may repeatedly re-experience their ordeal as nightmares, flashbacks or frightening thoughts, especially when exposed to events that remind them of their original trauma, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. They also may experience overanxious watchfulness or a tendency to withdraw or avoid situations and people that remind them of their traumatic experience, CDC said.
  • Mental health: Pushing past the stigma

    The wellness of service members is a priority across the Department of the Air Force, yet mental health has remained one of the most challenging components. Each service has struggled with an increasing number of suicides since the mid-2000’s. In 2018, there were 103 suicides among Air Force personnel. Despite efforts to improve the situation, such as the Air-Force-wide stand down, that number increased to 137 in 2019. The root of this issue could be the misconceptions about seeking help and outcomes to careers.
  • Reducing the stigma, encouraging mental health care in the military

    In the military, the stigma of mental health is grounded in the cultural misperception that a service member must have "zero defects" to be mission-ready. While the Department of Defense strives to identify and eliminate barriers to care that service members face regarding mental health treatment, stigma remains a significant issue within the military.
  • Team Phoenix inducts 42 new members

    “…I will faithfully uphold the Team Phoenix code of ethics, promote mutual respect, and help others in times of need. I promise to improve the culture around me and encourage my peers to do likewise. I take this obligation freely and I volunteer without reservation.” These words were repeated by 42 voices in the 378th Air Expeditionary Wing conference room as new members were inducted into Team Phoenix during a ceremony at Prince Sultan Air Base, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, May 8, 2021.
  • Run Toward the Fire: My journey through mental illness

    Suicide has been a part of my Air Force journey. It took a conversation with someone I trust and respect greatly, who also happens to be a mental health professional, to realize that suicide came nearer to defining my own story than I’d been willing to admit. “I’m going to give you one piece of advice,” he said.
  • Department of the Air Force leaders focus on resiliency

    Senior leaders are focused on building and growing resilience by establishing a task force called Operation Arc Care. This task force is currently reviewing resilience programs and overarching strategy using a phased approach which began in November.
  • Team Phoenix program takes flight at PSAB

    The 378th Air Expeditionary Wing is launching a program called Team Phoenix to help members get the most out of the installation’s helping agencies. Twenty-two trained personnel from various units across the wing can now help point people to the right helping agency to suit their needs, whether it be Mental Health, Equal Opportunity, Sexual Assault Prevention and Response, or the Chapel.
  • COVID stinks: A story of depression, recovery, resilience

    What if we lived in a world where people were forbidden from making physical contact with one another and the very air we needed to breathe was filled with a potentially deadly virus so new and easily contracted that everyone had to wear masks to leave their homes or be within six feet of another person? Oh wait, we are living in that world.
  • Airmen of the 363rd ISRW take a leap of faith

    Sitting on the small bench within the aircraft, surrounded by instructors and first-time jumpers, reality starts to set in. The aircraft elevates, getting colder and colder as we increase in altitude, causing the hair on my arms to stand up. As I look around at all the first-time jumpers, they all have the same expression; the expression that they too are coming to grips with the impending jump. We reach the necessary height and the red light by the door turns from red to green. The instructor taps my shoulder, letting me know that it’s time to stand up; it’s time to jump.
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