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Don’t Let COVID-19 Attack Your Mental Health

Airmen from the 9th Medical Operations Squadron Mental Health Clinic pose for a picture, April 15, 2020, at Beale Air Force Base California. These Airmen provide mental healthcare to patients, making sure they are mentally fit and mission ready. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

Airmen from the 9th Medical Operations Squadron Mental Health Clinic pose for a picture, April 15, 2020, at Beale Air Force Base California. These Airmen provide mental healthcare to patients, making sure they are mentally fit and mission ready. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Luis A. Ruiz-Vazquez)

BEALE AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

Physical distancing and isolation in conjunction with fear and anxiety about the pandemic can be overwhelming and cause strong emotions in people.

Many services are available to Airmen who might be struggling, making sure they are mentally fit and mission ready in these trying times.

“The Mental Health Clinic is working together with other base agencies to make sure that we are able to support our base community,” said Capt. Diana Zarb, 9th Medical Operations Squadron (MDOS) clinical psychologist. “The Mental Health Clinic’s primary focus right now is acute care for people who are really struggling.”

A strong focus on improving mental health can help people function and perform better in all aspects of life, whether it’s work, relationships, dealing with stress, or personal growth, said Zarb.

The pandemic has changed many lives, challenging the physical and mental well-being of Airmen.

“One of the concerns that we have with the COVID-19 situation is that a lot of people don’t have access to things they used to have access to that they used as part of their coping skills,” said Zarb. “Not having the ability to go to the gym or hang out with friends are big things that can affect a person’s mental health.”

The Mental Health Clinic advises Airmen to seek help when needed. There are a variety of options available to help Airmen get the help that best meets their needs.  Options range from the informal support provided by family and friends to more formal options like a chaplain, Military and Family Life Consultant, or Military One Source.

 “One of the biggest things you can do if you’re struggling is realizing that you don’t have to struggle alone. There is support for you,” said Zarb. “If you’re feeling like you need mental health services you can always call Mental Health and we can talk to you and help you get set up with what you need.”

For more information use the numbers below to contact helpful services.

 

Mental Health Clinic: 530-634-3420

Military and Family Life Counseling: 530-218-4023 or 530-708-0844

Military One Source: 800-342-9647

Local Suicide Crisis Line: 916-368-3111