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916th ARW KC-46 Pegasus in-air refuels 336th FS F-15E Strike Eagle

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing in-air refuels F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base over the sky of North Carolina.

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing in-air refuels F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base over the sky of North Carolina, Sept. 3, 2020. Air-to-air refueling is important to the Air Force’s warfighting ability as it makes global reach a reality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera)

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing in-air refuels F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base over the sky of North Carolina.

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing in-air refuels F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base over the sky of North Carolina, Sept. 3, 2020. The KC-46 helped sustain lethality by refueling the F-15E’s during the flight. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera)

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing air-to-air refuels an F-15E Strike Eagle from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base over the skies of North Carolina.

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing air-to-air refuels an F-15E Strike Eagle from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base over the skies of North Carolina, Sept. 3, 2020. In-air refueling is important to the Air Force’s warfighting ability as it makes global reach a reality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera)

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing in-air refuels an F-15E Strike Eagle from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base over North Carolina.

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing in-air refuels an F-15E Strike Eagle from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base over North Carolina, Sept. 3, 2020. In-air refueling is important to the Air Force’s warfighting ability as it makes global reach a reality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera)

An F-15E Strike Eagle from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base is in-air refueled by a KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing in the sky over North Carolina.

An F-15E Strike Eagle from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base is in-air refueled by a KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing in the sky over North Carolina, Sept. 3, 2020. The flight was the first time the KC-46 in-air refueled the F-15E since arriving on base this year. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera)

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing and an F-15E Strike Eagle from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base fly in the sky over North Carolina.

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing and an F-15E Strike Eagle from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base fly in the sky over North Carolina, Sept. 3, 2020. The KC-46 in-air refueled the Strike Eagle, enhancing the natural flying range and time the F-15E was in the air. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera)

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base flies in the sky over North Carolina.

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base flies in the sky over North Carolina, Sept. 3, 2020. The KC-46 is a multi-role tanker that can refuel all U.S., allied and coalition military aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera)

F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base fly in formation in the sky over North Carolina.

F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base fly in formation in the sky over North Carolina, Sept. 3, 2020. The F-15E has the capacity to fight its way to a target over long ranges, destroy enemy ground positions and fight its way out. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera)

F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base fly in the sky over North Carolina.

F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base fly in the sky over North Carolina, Sept. 3, 2020. The F-15E’s superior maneuverability and acceleration are achieved through its high engine thrust-to-weight ratio and low-wing loading. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera)

Two F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base fly over the sky of North Carolina.
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Two F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base fly over the sky of North Carolina, Sept. 3, 2020. The F-15E has the capacity to fight its way to a target over long ranges, destroy enemy ground positions and fight its way out. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera)

An F-15E Strike Eagle from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base flies in the sky over the North Carolina coast.
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An F-15E Strike Eagle from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base flies in the sky over the North Carolina coast, Sept. 3, 2020. The low-altitude navigation and targeting infrared for night system allows the F-15E to fly at low altitudes, at night and in any weather conditions, to attack ground targets with a variety of precision-guided and unguided weapons. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera)

An F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base breaks out of formation as the fly in the sky over North Carolina
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An F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base breaks out of formation as the fly in the sky over North Carolina, Sept. 3, 2020. The low wing loading of the F-15E is a vital factor in maneuverability, and combined with the high thrust-to-weight ratio, enables the aircraft to turn tightly without losing airspeed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Barrera)

SEYMOUR JOHNSON AIR FORCE BASE, N.C. --

A KC-46 Pegasus from the 916th Air Refueling Wing in-air refueled F-15E Strike Eagles from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base over the sky of North Carolina on Sept. 3, 2020.

The KC-46 is the Air Force’s newest multi-role aerial refueling tanker and strategic military transportation aircraft that can refuel all U.S., allied and coalition military aircraft making global reach a reality.

F-15E Strike Eagle from the 336th Fighter Squadron at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base were refueled by the KC-46, the first time the Pegasus in-air refueled the F-15E since arriving on base this year.

Air-to-air refueling is important to the Air Force’s warfighting ability as it increasing airpower lethality and range and sustains the Combat Air Force’s air superiority and capability to target enemy forces over long ranges.