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Being Multi-Capable: 366th FW Airmen train for Raging Gunfighter

A large group of Airmen pose for a group photo.

U.S. Air Force Col. Rick Goodman, 366th Fighter Wing commander and Chief Master Sgt. Joshua Tidwell, 366th FW command chief, pose for a group photo with the trainees of the Multi-Capable Airman Rodeo at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 22, 2021. For the past month and a half, Airmen from different squadrons have been engaged in the Multi-Capable Airman Rodeo, a training exercise that teaches Airmen from the 366th FW skill sets from different Air Force Specialty Codes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Akeem K. Campbell)

A picture of six large tents sitting on a snowy land.

A view of six completed tents for Capstone exercise at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 22, 2021. The Capstone exercise is “a stepping stone” that further prepares the Airmen for the Raging Gunfighter event. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Akeem K. Campbell)

Three Airmen hammer down a grounding round with a hammer.

A group of U.S. Air Force Airmen hammer down a grounding rod as part of capstone at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 22, 2021. The grounding rod grounds and disperse electricity and mitigates electrical safety hazards. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Akeem K. Campbell)

A picture of a forklift vehicle picking up an aircraft pallet.

A U.S. Air Force Airmen operates a forklift lifting an aircraft pallet during the capstone exercise at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 22, 2021. Knowing how to operate a forklift is part of the Multi-Capable Airmen Rodeo Training exercise, and it trains Airmen on how to handle situations involving a different Air Force Specialty Code. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Akeem K. Campbell)

A group of Airmen walks and search for simulated unexploded ordnance.

U.S. Air Force Airmen conduct a simulated unexploded ordnance grid search at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 22, 2021. Though the search is simulated, it trains the Airmen on what to look out for in real deployment situations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Akeem K. Campbell)

Chief Master Sgt. Erick Lizarraga briefs a group of Airmen about Raging Gunfighter.

U.S. Air Force Chief Master Sgt. Erick Lizarraga, 366th Civil Engineer Squadron operations flight superintendent, briefs Airmen on what to expect from the capstone exercise and what to expect for Raging Gunfighter at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 22, 2021. The capstone exercise put everything they have learned from the Multi-Capable Airman Rodeo to the test. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Akeem K. Campbell)

A group of Airmen lifts and a Tent Modular 60 shelter bag.

A group of U.S. Air Force Airmen carry a Tent Modular 60 shelter bag at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 22, 2021. The TM 60 shelter bag is part of the cargo needed to attend the capstone exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Akeem K. Campbell)

A group of Airmen lifts a door frame of a small shelter system tent.

A group of U.S. Air Force Airmen lift a door frame of a small shelter system tent at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 21, 2021. Building tents is part of the Multi-Capable Rodeo training exercise, teaching the Airmen what to do if members of 366th Civil Engineering Squadron are not available. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Akeem K. Campbell)

An Airman directs another Airmen who is driving a forklift.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Pope Daylen, 366th Logistics Readiness Squadron ground transportation journeyman, directs an Airman driving a forklift at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 21, 2021. As part of the Multi-Capable Airman Rodeo training exercise, Daylen was tasked to teach Airmen about how to operate a forklift. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Akeem K. Campbell)

A group of Airmen lifts a large green bin, known as the Titan Tub Bin ll.
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A group of U.S. Air Force Airmen lift a Titan Tub Bin II, at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 21, 2021. The lifting of the Ben is part of the Multi-Capable Airmen Rodeo training exercise, where Airmen learn how to load and secure cargo and prepare for Raging Gunfighter exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Akeem K. Campbell)

An Airman teaches a group of Airmen about the components of the generator.
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U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Kevin Rivera Calzada, 366th Civil Engineering Squadron electrical power production journeyman, teaches the Multi-Capable Airmen (MCA) Rodeo trainees about the components of a generator at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 20, 2021. The briefing is part of the MCA Rodeo training regimen, where the Airmen are trained to learn about different Air Force Specialty Codes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Akeem K. Campbell)

A group of Airmen in a snowy area pulls several ropes at the same time, in order to lift the middle of the tent.
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A group of 366th Fighter Wing Airmen pulls a thermal fly at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, Jan. 22, 2021. The thermal fly is in the mid-section of the tent, and it is good for stabilizing the temperature inside. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Akeem K. Campbell)

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho --

Teamwork, communication, adaptability and a drive to learn is what is required to participate in Raging Gunfighter, an exercise that tests the Airmen’s ability to be effective in a deployed environment.

For the past month and a half, personnel have been engaged in the Multi-Capable Airman (MCA) Rodeo, a training exercise that teaches Airmen from different squadrons skill sets from various Air Force Specialty Codes (AFSC). This training is meant to prepare Airmen for Raging Gunfighter at Michael Army Airfield, Utah, Feb. 01, to Feb. 04, 2020.

“It’s a great opportunity for so many Airmen from different AFSCs to work together with one another,” said Senior Master Sgt. Melanie Sampson, 366th Operation Support Squadron (OSS) maintenance training superintendent. “It’s important they understand how everyone operates at a different level, gains experience from one another and still be able to develop as a team.”

The training was led by three senior noncommissioned officers: Chief Master Sgt. Erick Lizarraga, 366th Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) operations flight superintendent, Senior Master Sgt. Scott Dietrich, 366th Logistics and Readiness Squadron (LRS) deployment and distribution flight superintendent and Sampson.

“The logistical part of the planning was difficult, but I’m so grateful for the team that we did have with Dietrich and Lizarraga,” Sampson said. “It’s almost like learning another MCA concept. We were able to lean on one another and use our strengths to make a better team.”

The Airmen participating in this exercise were divided into three teams: red team, blue team and green team, in order to accelerate the learning process.

The red team consists of Airmen from the 389th Fighter Squadron, 366th Munitions Squadron and 366th Maintenance Squadron. The blue team consists of Airmen from the 366th LRS, 366th Force Support Squadron and 366th OSS. The green team consists of Airmen from the 366th Communications Squadron, 366th CES and 366th Security Forces Squadron.

Each team learned a variety of skills, ranging from operating a forklift, building large tents, loading and securing cargo, doing airfield checks and more.

On Jan. 22, 2021, they engaged in a capstone exercise where all three teams applied the skills they learned.

“This is a stepping stone that will lead into Raging Gunfighter, and we are building momentum off of this,” Lizarraga said. “What we want to do is let the Airmen experience this type of environment, and let them go through some of those mission essential tasks, so we can tweak any possible mistakes. When they participate in Raging Gunfighter, they will have a higher rate of success - even with limiting factors.”

Even though it was snowing during the capstone, the Airmen persevered by completing several tasks such as: preparing cargo, running a simulated unexploded ordnance grid search, building structures, using a forklift, activating and operating generators, heating ventilation and air conditioning and environmental control units and providing security overwatch.

“Today’s training was a great example about how Airmen were able to learn skills from different AFSCs, and show that they were able to execute what they have learned,” Dietrich said. “They proved that they can go to an austere environment, set up and operate from that camp, sustain themselves and then tear down and leave in an expeditious manner.”

With this training, Airmen have gained knowledge on more than just one AFSC, and have developed the skill to be effective in a different environment - making them true examples of being multi-capable.

“I think the training is really cool,” said Senior Airman Skylar Dean, 366th Force Support Squadron services journeyman. “Coming out and seeing all the different AFSCs is something I personally never done before - watching everyone do different jobs is really valuable.”