HomeNewsArticle Display

729th ACS participates in Agile Thunder exercise

Four Airmen working on a AN/TPS-75 radar system.

U.S. Air Force Airmen from 729th Air Control Squadron balance the AN/TPS-75, or Tipsy 75 radar, March 9, 2021 at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The squadron recently took part in a mobility exercise called Agile Thunder that validated their ability to deploy at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Cynthia Griggs)

An Airman guides an electrical control unit onto a forklift.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Conor Preston, 729th Air Control Squadron, guides a forklift to move an electrical control unit March 9, 2021 at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The squadron recently took part in a mobility exercise called Agile Thunder that validated their ability to deploy at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Cynthia Griggs)

Airmen install a grounding pole.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Aaron Horton and Spec. 3 Michael Shoemo, 729th Air Control Squadron, install a grounding pole March 9, 2021 at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The squadron recently took part in a mobility exercise called Agile Thunder that validated their ability to deploy at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Cynthia Griggs)

An Airman hooking up an electric cable to a generator.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Thom Juillerat, 729th Air Control Squadron, hooks up electric cable March 9, 2021 at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The squadron recently took part in a mobility exercise called Agile Thunder that validated their ability to deploy at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Cynthia Griggs)

An Airman holding an electric cable.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Thom Juillerat, 729th Air Control Squadron, organizes electric cable March 9, 2021 at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The squadron recently took part in a mobility exercise called Agile Thunder that validated their ability to deploy at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Cynthia Griggs)

Three Airman working on an AN/TPS-75 radar system.

U.S. Air Force Airmen from 729th Air Control Squadron balance the AN/TPS-75, or Tipsy 75 radar, March 9, 2021 at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The squadron recently took part in a mobility exercise called Agile Thunder that validated their ability to deploy at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Cynthia Griggs)

Three Airmen working on an AN/TPS-75 radar system.

U.S. Air Force Airmen from 729th Air Control Squadron balance the AN/TPS-75, or Tipsy 75 radar, March 9, 2021 at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The squadron recently took part in a mobility exercise called Agile Thunder that validated their ability to deploy at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Cynthia Griggs)

Six Airmen strapping down cargo on the bed of a military vehicle.

U.S. Air Force Airmen from 729th Air Control Squadron tighten straps on cargo March 9, 2021 at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The squadron recently took part in a mobility exercise called Agile Thunder that validated their ability to deploy at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Cynthia Griggs)

Three Airmen tightening the straps down on cargo sitting on a pallet.

U.S. Air Force Airmen from 729th Air Control Squadron tighten straps on cargo March 9, 2021 at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The squadron recently took part in a mobility exercise called Agile Thunder that validated their ability to deploy at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Cynthia Griggs)

An Airman tightens down straps on cargo cases.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 11

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Mark D'Angelo, 729th Air Control Squadron, tightens straps on cargo March 9, 2021 at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The squadron recently took part in a mobility exercise called Agile Thunder that validated their ability to deploy at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Cynthia Griggs)

Two Airmen tight down straps on cargo cases.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 11

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Nicolas Geanta and Airman 1st Class Malik Canty, 729th Air Control Squadron, tighten straps on cargo March 9, 2021 at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The squadron recently took part in a mobility exercise called Agile Thunder that validated their ability to deploy at a moment’s notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Cynthia Griggs)

HILL AIR FORCE BASE, Utah --

Validating its ability to deploy on a moment’s notice anywhere in the world and demonstrate air battle management command and control capabilities, the 729th Air Control Squadron recently participated in a mobility exercise called Agile Thunder.

“This exercise, and others like it, force us to prove that we are able to respond to unsure conditions and answer the kinds of problems we would face in the field,” said Capt. Eric Dayhuff, 729th ACS mission systems flight commander.    

The exercise was broken into two phases. During phase one, the squadron tested its equipment, then packed and moved it. In the second phase, they built a site and provided command and control for aircraft sorties.

The first phase also tested the installation’s 75th Logistics Readiness Squadron ability to pack and ship equipment. The 75th LRS serves as the “deployment machine” for all of Hill Air Force Base, said Maj. Jon Arceta, 75th LRS commander.

“For this exercise, the goal was to deploy our 729th ACS partners, personnel and cargo as efficient and expeditious as we could, in order to meet the combatant commander’s needs downrange,” Arceta said.

The squadron was inspected on unit mobility procedures, individual deployment readiness and the ability to survive and operate skills in a deployed environment.

“More than just working on our equipment, we are expected to employ it in realistic field conditions in order to make the mission happen,” Dayhuff said. “These types of exercises help highlight where we are strong and where we can improve in the future.”

The 729th ACS is a geographically separated unit of the 552nd Air Control Wing at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma. The squadron is one of three active-duty air control squadrons in the Air Force and has approximately 400 personnel assigned to the squadron.

Dayhuff said the biggest challenge to any exercise involving hundreds of people and dozens of equipment items is communication.

“This exercise highlighted the flexibility and preserving spirit of our team,” he said. “Despite facing a myriad of challenges, both expected and unexpected, the team found a way to pull together and ultimately meet our critical objectives and build our competency across the board.”