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  • SAF Deputy Chief Information Officer surveys Tyndall

    In the weeks following Hurricane Michael’s landfall over Tyndall Air Force Base, Fla., various members of Air Force senior leadership and their representatives have come to survey the damages and coordinate with Tyndall leadership for a plan for the installation. The most recent visitor was Secretary of the Air Force Deputy Chief Information Officer, Bill Marion.
  • Air Force begins work on Tyndall AFB rebuild with PMO

    Following Hurricane Michael, the Air Force Installation and Mission Support Center and its partners established a program management office at Tyndall to lead redevelopment and reconstruction efforts. The Air Force initiated several task forces to aid in recovery. One goal is to focus on installation facilities and infrastructure with a mission to assess facility damage, determine usability, and preserve capability. The PMO continues those efforts, which are expected to take upwards of five years and cost approximately $3 billion.
  • Hanscom lays groundwork for comms at Tyndall

    Program managers in the Command, Control, Communications, Intelligence and Networks Directorate here are exercising every one of the words in their five-word title by reconstituting a communications network almost totally wiped out by winds, flooding and infrastructure damage. First responders have set up interval communications systems relying on a few existing nodes, coupled with generator-powered satellite truck systems. The Air Force’s long-term goal is to build an organic communication infrastructure from scratch using an as-a-service model.
  • Task Force Raptor completes mission

    Within five days of Hurricane Michael devastating Tyndall, the five-person Task Force Raptor leadership team from Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Va., and Tyndall Air Force Base conducted an initial assessment on the remaining F-22 Raptors. Following this assessment, the team was confident the Raptors would fly. Moore credits her leadership team of Chief Master Sgt. Eric Butts, Senior Master Sgt. Christopher Case, both from the 1st Aircraft Maintenance Squadron and Senior Master Sergeants Johnny Hatfield, 325th Maintenance Group and Marion Elsas, 325th Maintenance Squadron, with solving this “gigantic problem by providing level headed leadership, vision and lots of humor.”
  • Nov. 19, 2018: A letter from Col. Brian S. Laidlaw, Commander 325th Fighter Wing

    Team Tyndall, The base recovery efforts are coming along well. Our team is hard at work cleaning up the base, protecting buildings, and making the area safe. In the past few weeks, we have allowed on base residents and those storing personal property on base access to their homes and storage areas to facilitate insurance claims and property removal.
  • Tyndall F-22 family proves resilient after Hurricane Michael, father’s plane crash

    Ten days after Hurricane Michael ravaged Maj. Jeremy Boudreaux’s home and Tyndall AFB, he got a call that his father was killed in a plane crash approximately 30 miles northwest of Eglin AFB. Boudreaux and his wife, Jessie, had evacuated to Auburn, Ala. but when they got the call that his father passed away they drove to the crash site.
  • QF-16 delivered to Hurricane ravaged Tyndall AFB

    The recent delivery of a QF-16 from Boeing to the 82nd Aerial Target Squadron marks an important milestone on the road to Tyndall AFB’s recovery. The QF-16 enables live fire weapons testing in the Joint Gulf Range Complex, which is made up of 180,000 square miles that stretches from Key West to northwest Florida, and allows for joint test and training exercises
  • 325 Munitions Flight : Moving ordnance and the mission forward

    In the four weeks since Hurricane Michael swept through the gulf coast and Tyndall Air Force Base, the 325th Maintenance Squadron Munitions Flight, with the help of munitions Airmen from across the Air Force, have assessed their munitions facility for damage and are now moving their mission forward. The Airmen have been busy since their return. Their initial priority was damage assessment and accountability of all the ordnance on Tyndall. The damage to the facility included four collapsed buildings. Once the initial damage assessment was complete they began moving munitions out of the deteriorated facilities with the help of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Airmen.
  • One month after Michael

    A month ago, Hurricane Michael upgraded from a category two to a category four hurricane overnight. In an effort to keep the base’s most important assets safe, its people, Col. Brian Laidlaw, 325th Fighter Wing commander released an evacuation order. With exception of the ride-out team, comprised of nearly 100 Tyndall members, everyone left. Among the mix of those remaining were first responders, base leadership and command post personnel. The initial assessment of the aftermath was bleak, but in the weeks since, the outlook has taken a turn for the better. The base has built back up to more than 2,000 personnel with nearly half on the ground originally from Tyndall.
  • Army, Navy provide Tyndall much-needed support

    While Hurricane Michael created catastrophic devastation to most of Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, the relief efforts were an instant reminder of the symbiotic relationship between military branches. In the days following the storm, the Air Force came in droves to provide support with the Navy and Army not far behind. Engineers from the Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 133, Gulfport, Mississippi, and the 46th Engineer Battalion, Ft. Polk, Louisiana, hit the ground running. They traveled in convoys bringing with them construction vehicles and equipment. Unable to bring everything they would need, they also planned to have contracted vehicles meet them at Tyndall.
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